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Graphic Design Introduction: This course is adapted from a book by Ken Jeffery, entitled: Graphic Design and Print Production Fundamentals, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, and available for download from: http://open.bccampus.ca. Figure 1.1. On any given day, you look around your surroundings and come in contact with print design. Information comes in many forms: the graphics on the front of a cereal box, or on the packaging in your cupboards; the information on billboards and bus shelter posters you pass on your way to work; the graphics on the outside of the cup that holds your double latte; and the printed numbers on the dial of the speedometer in your car. Information is communicated by the numbers on the buttons in an elevator; on the signage hanging in stores; or on the amusing graphics on the front of your friend’s T-shirt. So many items in your life hold an image that is created to convey information. And all of these things are designed by someone. Traditionally referred to as graphic design, communication design is the process by which messages and images are used to convey information to a targeted audience. It is within this spectrum that this course will address the many steps of creating and producing physical, printed, or other imaged products that people interact with on a daily basis. QUESTION ONE: Complete the sentence by choosing the correct option: Traditionally referred to as graphic design, _____________ design is the process by which messages and images are used to convey information to a targeted audience. communication product people