Loading
Notes
Study Reminders
Support
Text Version

Set your study reminders

We will email you at these times to remind you to study.
  • Monday

    -

    7am

    +

    Tuesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Wednesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Thursday

    -

    7am

    +

    Friday

    -

    7am

    +

    Saturday

    -

    7am

    +

    Sunday

    -

    7am

    +


0:09

Hello. 
In previous videos, you looked at subject verb agreement 
using AP style and writing accurately.




0:19

In this video, we'll discuss how to proofread an article.




0:24

Proofread means reading a finished article to check for errors.




0:32

It's very important for a journalist to do this before they submit an article 
to the copy editor, who was introduced in video one for publication.




0:43

We'll focus on three aspects of proofreading, 
Punctuation, Capitalization, and Spelling. 
Let's look at Punctuation first.




0:56

Punctuation means comas, periods, apostrophes, colons, and other marks.




1:03

A common error is to have one long sentence 
separated by a comma when it should be split into two sentences. 
For example, the government voted on the legislation last night, 
it passed the law with a large majority.




1:22

This should two sentences. 
With a period after night and a new sentence starting with it.




1:31

Putting apostrophes in the wrong place is a common error that journalists make. 
An example of this is the difference between it's, 
a contraction of it is, and its, a possessive pronoun.




1:45

Let's look at example of these. 
It is the best hospital in the region could be contracted to, 
it's the best hospital in the region.




1:57

There are twelve beds in each of it's rooms. 
Here, the its is a possessive pronoun meaning the hospital so 
there is no apostrophe.




2:10

Capitalization is another important part of proofreading.




2:14

Look at every capital letter and decide if it's necessary.




2:19

Remember, in AP style, 
titles of people are capitalized before the name but not after. 
President Obama, but Barrack Obama, the US president. 
Also, titles of books and movies have capital letters for every noun and verb.




2:38

You should also make sure that people's names, 
places, cities and countries are all capitalized. 
Fidel Castro, Niagara Falls, Lagos, and 
China all have capital letters at the beginning.




2:55

Spelling is the last part of proofreading we're going to look at in this video.




3:01

The spell checker in your word processing program can help with this. 
But remember, a spell checker can only tell you if it is a word, 
not the right word. 
In this example, Czech is a person from the Czech republic, so it is a word 
that a spell checker will recognize but it is not the word you want to use.




3:25

You're is a contraction of you are. 
And again, a word but not the right word. 
There are many spelling rules in English. 
We'll just look at two of the most common. 
One, Changing y to -ies, and two, Doubling up consonants.




3:46

With words like say or key, there is a vowel just before the y. 
For say, there is an a directly before the y. 
For key, there is an e directly before the y. 
In these cases, just add s to the word.




4:06

However, in words such as carry or baby, the letter before the y is not a vowel. 
The consonant r in carry and the consonant b in baby. 
In these cases, the y is changed to an i and you add es.




4:23

Doubling up consonants also has a rule. 
When the last syllable is consonant-vowel-consonant, 
in words like run or win then you double up the final consonant. 
Runner, running, winner, winning. 
However, if the last syllable does not go consonant-vowel-consonant, 
perhaps there are two vowels in a row like eat or hear, or maybe there are two consonants like in the word start, then you do not double up the last consonant, eating, hearing, starter. 
So in this video, we looked at proofreading. 
Focusing on Punctuation, Capitalization, and Spelling. 
Remember to proofread the next assessment