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The Elevator Speech

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0:09

Hello, in this video we will discuss what to say when you are networking.




0:15

Job seekers often meet many people while they are searching for a job. 
We will discuss how to prepare and practice networking elevator speech. 
Which is a short description of skills and career goals.




0:31

For many of us, it is easier to meet and talk to new people if we have prepared and 
practiced something to say about ourselves.




0:41

Let's imagine that you just got on an elevator 
with a high level manager in your company.




0:46

After you greet each other, 
you want to tell the manager a little bit more about yourself. 
What would you say?




0:53

Most people would say nothing, and 
miss the chance to make a good impression on the manager. 
However,successful job seekers should have a prepared 
statement they can use to introduce themselves to another person quickly.




1:12

This short description is known as an elevator speech.




1:20

Because the average amount of time in an elevator is about 45 seconds. 
Even though the elevator speech is short, each should give enough 
information to make the listener know who you are, and what you can do.




1:37

Let's start with the basic information that you should include in your elevator 
speech.




1:44

First, tell them your full name and 
current job title, department, or employer.




1:52

Second, tell the other person what you are looking for. 
Information or a kind of job in an industry, field, or location.




2:02

Third, tell them something about a past job or 
experience that could be important to them. 
Fourth, tell them about a job skill that you have and are very good at. 
After you've described a little bit about yourself, 
then you can ask the other person a general question. 
A general question is one that is easy to answer. 
For example, do you know if the company is hiring anyone right now?




2:29

Asking questions helps to keep the conversation going, and 
allows you to find out more about them.




2:37

Let's see how an example job seeker, 
Amanda Smith, would introduce herself when networking.




2:44

In this situation, 
Amanda is at a professional conference with many people in the auto industry. 
And she is talking with some people from Toyota.




2:55

Here's an example of what she could say to introduced herself.




3:00

First, she greets them with her name and gives her current job. 
Hello, I'm Amanda Smith and I have been in sales for about five years.




3:12

Second, she explains what she's looking for.




3:16

I'm currently looking for a sales position in the auto industry.




3:22

Third, she tells them about a current or past experience.




3:28

One of the things I like most about sales, is meeting and 
talking with new customers all the time.




3:35

Fourth, she describes a job skill. 
I'm really good at listening to customers, and 
I am able to understand what they really want.




3:46

Lastly, she asks a general question. 
Do you know if Toyota is hiring any new salespeople in this area?




3:56

So, by asking a question at the end, Amanda keeps the conversation going, 
and gives the listeners a chance to introduce themselves as well.




4:07

The question at the end is optional or your choice.




4:13

In summary, job seekers should have a short, prepared description or 
an elevator speech that they can use to introduce themselves when networking.




4:25

A good elevator speech includes your name and current job, what you are looking for, 
something from a past experience, and a short description of your best job skill.




4:38

Even though it is short, it can give other people a lot of information about you.




4:45

In the next video, 
we will talk about how to deliver your elevator speech with confidence.


0:09

Hello. 
In this video, we're going to talk about the pronunciation and 
delivery of a networking elevator speech.




0:19

When we are networking, we not only need to think about what we are saying but 
also how we are saying it. 
We should be aware of our word choices and how we say them.




0:31

Speakers who use effective stress, pausing and 
intonation are often easier to understand and show confidence.




0:41

We will start by defining stress, pausing and intonation and 
then we will look at an example of how the delivery can show confidence.




0:53

So what are stress, pausing and intonation?




0:59

When we talk about stress, we mean words that are longer and louder.




1:09

Stressed words are usually important keywords that you want the listener 
to hear clearly.




1:16

Let's look at an example sentence from Amanda's elevator speech. 
Which words are longer and louder?




1:26

I've been in sales for about five years.




1:30

In this sentence, the word sales and five years are stressed. 
These are the words that the listener needs to hear clearly.




1:40

Pauses are also important when speaking.




1:44

Pauses are the short silence between words.




1:52

In English there's usually a pause after stressed words. 
Some speakers have longer or shorter pauses, but there is a pause.




2:03

Let's look at the same sentence and notice the words that are said together and 
where to pause.




2:09

I've been in sales for about five years.




2:13

Amanda pauses after the word sales and five years.




2:18

You should also notice that the pause follows the words with the most stress.




2:24

Intonation is the rising or falling of a sound.




2:28

Intonation is used to show that you're asking a question or ending a statement.




2:39

Rising intonation usually signals that the speaker isn't finished speaking or 
signals a yes or no question.




2:48

Falling intonation is used to signal the end of a statement or 
a wh question that begins with who, what, when, where or how.




2:59

Let's look at Amanda's intonation. 
Notice how her intonation falls at the end of the statement. 
I'm really good at listening to customers.




3:10

Now notice that our intonation rises at the end of this yes or no question. 
Do you know if Toyota is hiring any new salespeople in this area?




3:21

Intonation is important because it shows your level of confidence.




3:27

If Amanda has too much rising intonation she would sound like she's asking 
too many questions or that she's not sure of herself.




3:37

On the other hand, 
too much falling intonation can make her sound like she's impatient or unfriendly.




3:46

In a networking elevator speech you want to show confidence but 
not sound impatient or unfriendly.




3:54

If Amanda doesn't sound confident 
the other people will not be confident in her skills or abilities. 
Likewise, if she sounds impatient, 
the other people may think she's not easy to work with.




4:10

Now, I'm going to say the networking elevator speech and 
model the stress, pausing and intonation that shows confidence.




4:21

Pay attention to the words that are louder. 
Also notice how I pause and the intonation that I use.




4:30

Hello, I'm Amanda Smith and I have been in sales for about five years.




4:35

I'm currently looking for a sales position in the auto industry.




4:41

One of the thing I like most about sales is meeting is talking with new customers all the time.