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Your Profile as a Job Seeker

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0:10

Hello, in this video, 
we will talk about how to make a list of your interests and skills.




0:17

Then we will talk about three types of skills, things you do, 
things you know and ways you act.




0:24

Knowing your interests and 
skills helps you to choose your career that is best for you.




0:29

Let's begin with a definition of interests and skills.




0:33

Interests are subjects, ideas or things you want to know more about.




0:39

Interests can also be an activity or hobby that you enjoy doing in your free time.




0:47

For example, if you like to play computer games, cook or read books, 
you could say those are interests or hobbies.




0:56

What are your interests or hobbies? 
Write two lists on one page, the left side with subjects or things that 
you like learning about and the right side a list of things that you enjoy doing.




1:10

When making these lists, think about yourself as a person, not just a worker.




1:17

Let's look at this with an example job seeker, John.




1:21

One of his interests is reading Internet news articles about computer programming.




1:26

He should write that in the left side of the paper.




1:30

John also enjoys playing online computer games, so 
he should put that on the right side of the paper.




1:38

When you write all of the things that you are interested in, 
you may notice that they are related or connected in some way.




1:47

Many career coaches say that knowing your interests or 
hobbies often helps you to identify your skills.




1:56

So, what exactly are skills and how are they different from interests?




2:03

First, a skill is the ability to do something well.




2:08

Some skills are natural, meaning that we are born with these skills.




2:13

Other skills are learned and we develop these skills over time.




2:18

Skills can also be divided into more categories. 
Functional skills are things you can do, like driving.




2:30

Subject skills are things you know, for example, Japanese history.




2:37

And personal trait skills are ways that you act, such as being on time.




2:47

For example, let's look at John's skills. 
We know that John likes to read about computer programming and 
play online computer games.




2:56

When he plays games online, he is able to watch the screen and 
type quickly at the same time.




3:02

John is also very good in all of his math classes, and he asks many questions. 
So we can say that he has strong math skills and he is curious. 
Using this example, we can see that John has functional skills, typing quickly, 
subject skills, math, and personal Trait skills, curiosity.




3:26

Now that John knows his interests and skills, he might begin looking for 
jobs that are related to technology or computer programming.




3:36

Like John, once other job seekers identify their interests and skills, 
they are more likely to choose a job or career path that is best for them.




3:49

Let's review what we've learned about interests and skills.




3:54

Interests are things we want to know about or activities that we like. 
Skills are the ability, natural or learned, to do things well.




4:04

Our skills are often divided by functional skills, things you do, subject skills, 
things you know, and personal trait skills, ways that you act.




4:17

Next, you will read about this types of skills in the reading, 
What You Offer the World.


0:09

Hello, in this video, we're going to talk about some useful words and 
phrases that you'll hear many times throughout the job search process. 
We will organize these words into three categories, things, actions, and people. 
Lets begin with important definition of things, or general concepts. 
Occupation and career.




0:34

An occupation is like a job because both are very specific. 
For example, being a waiter is a job or occupation. 
If Tom works as a waiter, a bartender, and a restaurant manager over 20 years, 
he can say that he has a career in the restaurant industry. 
An occupation is a person's work as a way to earn money.




1:03

A career is an occupation or a profession that requires special training and 
continues over a long period of time.




1:16

Here's another example, Uki has worked for the clothing company UNIQLO for ten years. 
She began her career in the fashion industry with different occupations, 
first as a sales clerk, then as a store manager. 
Now, she works at the company's main office as a fashion designer.




1:38

Let's look at two more definitions of things. 
Employment is a general term for the activity that people do to make money.




1:50

When someone asks you about your employment history, focus on work for 
which you were paid money.




1:57

A job application is a written request for employment, 
usually a specific document to be completed.




2:08

In the job search process, there are some actions, 
or verbs, that are very important. 
Let's look at five of these. 
The first is to search for a job, this means to look for 
work in a specific occupation.




2:30

To apply for a job is to formally ask for employment, usually in writing.




2:37

This means completing a specific job application or 
sending a documents like a resume and cover letter. 
We will talk more about these later in units two and three.




2:49

To interview for a job is to answer question in a formal meeting.




2:58

Most interviews are face to face but 
sometimes people can interview by phone or video calls. 
To be hired for a job, is to be given a job and then paid for the work.




3:12

If someone says you're hired, that means you got the job.




3:17

To work is to do an activity related to one's occupation.




3:25

Now, let's move on to people.




3:28

A job seeker is someone who is looking for a job.




3:37

After a person applies for a job they become a candidate or 
an applicant which is a person who might get the job.




3:50

These next two words sound almost the same but have very different meanings. 
Pay attention to the ending sounds of these two words, employer and employee.




4:04

An employer is the person making the decision to give the applicant a job.




4:13

The employer can be a specific person or can also be a company or organization.




4:20

When a candidate is hired and begins working, he is then called an employee.




4:30

Employee is a more formal word for worker. 
By now you probably noticed many of this few vocabulary words look similar. But they are actually different word forms, nouns and verbs. One way to help remember all of this new words is to organize them into three categories. Things are nouns, actions are verbs and people are nouns. Let's move on to a game where you can practice grouping the words into the correct category. Things, actions or people.


0:10

Hello, in this video, we are going to talk about how your interests and 
skills are related to different types of jobs.




0:20

There are six types of interests that are related to certain kinds of careers. 
Many job seekers have interests in more than one category.




0:29

This helps them, because they have a larger list of work-related skills.




0:35

The first category is for people who have an interest in doing things.




0:41

These people like to work with their hands, use tools and be physically active. 
They like to move around a lot.




0:50

Some jobs that might be good for 
this people include working in a restaurants, construction or farming.