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Back in the 20th century, emotions were considered to be chaotic, haphazard, and superfluous and incompatible with cognitive thinking and reasoning. They were seen as largely visceral and disorganised and anybody expressing emotions really resulted from a lack of effective adjustment.
 


Emotions, nowadays, are considered a lot more favourably and a lot more positively. They're known to arouse, sustain, and direct activity.
 


We know that emotions are involved in the learning process and in accessing memory and, also, we know that emotions are involved in good decision making. They are a part of what makes us human and they're part of the total economy of all living organisms.
 


They're not, actually, in opposition to intelligence and work very well combined with cognitive intelligence and an effective use of emotions instructs a higher order of intelligence, which we now know is emotional intelligence.
 
Charles Darwin speculated that non-verbal expression and communication evolved in the absence of language, as a mechanism to help us survive. As an evolutionary process, emotions are found in other animals and so are innate - they're inborn. A genetic component is, therefore, likely to be involved in the way in which we experience and express emotion, but our emotions don't necessarily define our destiny, how we grow up and what we become as we grow into adults. So, a timid child doesn't necessarily grow into a timid, shy, unconfident adult.
 
The way in which our parents use and expressed their emotions helped us to learn how we work with our emotions.
 
Abuse in childhood has an influence on how emotions are managed and used, and hinders learning about the
appropriate use of emotion.
 
A poor ability to read the emotions of other people may lead to the development of poor social skills, with the consequence that, for these people, it becomes difficult to build long-term, lasting relationships.
 
There's a strong biological purpose for emotion.  Emotions signal nonverbally to others that they may have to take some immediate action.
 
So, expressions of surprise, fear, anger and disgust will encourage those around us to respond in ways that are appropriate to that emotion providing a very strong impulse for them to take action.
 
Each emotion is expressed in a unique, physiological manner in order that our bodies are prepared for the appropriate action.
 
In other words, the emotion prepares us so that we can take flight or fight, or perhaps choose another response.
 
Our emotion and our action provides a motivational trigger to others around us to act in similar ways.
 
Our emotions provide us with the motivation that we need to commit events to memory, and so emotions become fundamental to the way in which we learn and to our learning.