Loading

Module 9: Tourism - Generating Sales

Notes
Study Reminders
Support
Text Version

The Customer Buying Process - 1

Set your study reminders

We will email you at these times to remind you to study.
  • Monday

    -

    7am

    +

    Tuesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Wednesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Thursday

    -

    7am

    +

    Friday

    -

    7am

    +

    Saturday

    -

    7am

    +

    Sunday

    -

    7am

    +

Tourism - Marketing and Promotion
Generating Sales
The Customer Buying Process - 1

Introduction

Once the target audience had been identified and the objectives specified, the promotional team must decide how they will encourage each customer to move through every stage of the customer buying process.

Remember, the customer buying process is as follows:

Gaining the customer’s attention
Developing an understanding about the benefits being offered
Creating positive attitudes about what is being promoted
Developing customer preferences for what is being sold
Persuading the customer to purchase
Convincing the tourist to purchase again

Gaining the Customer’s Attention
The aim of all advertising and promotion is to inform people about a product. However, in order to do so it is essential to gain the attention of potential customers. Gaining people’s attention is especially important today as people are bombarded with advertisements from billboards, newspapers, magazines, television, radio and the internet.

Because of this, marketers must accept that they cannot gain the attention of every person who views their promotional material. Instead, they must cater their campaign strategy for people that are likely to be interested in the product. The strategy should specify the amount of people that wish to view the campaign and the media outlets they wish to utilise.

Gaining the Customer’s Attention
For example, an aim for a golfing holiday campaign may be to have the advertisement gain the attention of 5,000 golf enthusiasts within the next month. Most media outlets have excellent records on the number of people their material reaches.

Such records will help marketers decide on the best types of media to use for each campaign. For the golfing trip, promoters may decide to advertise in the sport section of a national newspaper, in golf magazines and during the TV broadcast of a major golfing tournament.

Developing an Understanding of the Benefits Being Offered
Once marketers have gained the attention of potential customers, they must ensure that they fully understand what is being advertised. Furthermore, advertisers must make the product memorable. Promotional campaigns often try to achieve these two goals by utilising a slogan or catchphrase in an advertisement. Catchphrases are useful as they can encapsulate a product and help customers to remember it.

An example of a promotional campaign that utilised a catchphrase to facilitate comprehension and recall is the “Incredible India” campaign. The India Ministry of Tourism launched the campaign in 2002. Its overall aim was to attract more tourists to India than ever before. The campaign was the first time that the Indian government made a concentrated effort to attract tourism.

Developing an Understanding of the Benefits Being Offered
The campaign utilised print and television advertisements. Each advertisement showed a tourist enjoying one of India’s unique attractions. In one advertisement a tourist is receiving treatment in the ancient Ayurveda tradition. In another, a tourist is shown riding an Indian elephant. The slogan works perfectly with these images to showcase India as a destination that is unique. This campaign was especially useful in helping India establish itself as an exciting travel destination.

Creating Positive Attitudes About What is Being Promoted
The next stage of the buying process is creating positive attitudes about what is being promoted. In this stage, the promoter is seeking to create or strengthen positive associations or to change negative associations people have about a tourism product.

A prominent example of an advertiser trying to change attitudes about its product is the “We Try Harder” campaign for Avis Car Rentals. Like all tourism services, there is severe competition amongst car rental companies. In the early 1960s, Avis was the second most popular car rental company in America. However, it trailed behind the market leader, Hertz, by a large margin. Because of this, people generally viewed Avis as being inferior to Hertz at the time.

Creating Positive Attitudes About What is Being Promoted
The “We Try Harder” campaign sought to change this attitude by highlighting the benefits of being “no. 2”. The advertisement emphasised that as Avis was not the market leader, they will always provide excellent customer service in order to attract more customers. In this way, they transformed the negative attitudes some customers had into positive attitudes. Within a year of the campaign’s launch, Avis went from losing $3.2 million a year to earning $1.2 million. This was a result of a greatly increased market share. In 1961, Hertz had 61% of the car rental market while Avis had 29%. In 1963, Hertz’s market share fell to 49% while Avis’s had risen to 36%.

END OF UNIT:
The Customer Buying Process - 1