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Module 3: Tourism Industry - Career Development

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Careers in Tourism 1

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Tourism Industry – Sectors and Career Development
The Tourist Industry
Careers in Tourism - 1

Introduction
There are a number of ways in which one can gain employment in the tourist industry. Indeed the tourist industry is made up of a number of areas that require a huge variety of different skills and expertise.

This following two units will explain all the different areas of the tourist industry and how one can gain employment in these areas.

Airlines
Airlines employ over 1 million people worldwide. Airline employees fall into one of two groups; flight crew or ground crew.

Flight Crew: The flight crew is made up of the cockpit crew and the cabin crew.

Cockpit Crew: The cockpit crew consists of the captain, co-pilot and the second officer. The captain is responsible for operating the aircraft and supervising other crew members. The co-pilot is responsible for charting the route and calculating flying time. The second officer inspects the plane before take-off and after landing and determines the amount of fuel needed. Smaller planes are designed to require only two people in the cockpit, the pilot and the first officer.

In order to be legally able to fly pilots must have:
A university degree
Commercial pilot’s licence
An instrument rating
An airline transport pilot's license
A radio operator's permit
1,500 hours of previous flight hours in the military or general aviation

Pilots begin as second officers. Promotion to first officer takes five to ten years. Promotion to captain takes an additional ten years.

Cabin Crew: There can be up to 16 people in the cabin crew. The cabin crew is responsible for the care and safety of the passengers. Their duties include serving food and beverages, demonstrating safety equipment, giving first aid when required and calming nervous flyers.

A college background is preferred for flight attendants. Training consists of a four-week to six-week training program. Entry level cabin crew can aspire to positions such as a purser (the team leader of a flight crew), training supervisor or a variety of ground positions in sales or public relations for the airline.


Ground Crew: Ground crew positions are in reservations and sales, passenger services, maintenance and security.

Reservation agents handle calls from passengers inquiring about flights and make reservations. A college education is preferred for these positions as well as office experience and typing skills. Reservation agents can advance to sales representatives or flight attendant positions.

Passenger service employees work in the airport terminal checking luggage, assigning seats and boarding passengers.

Every airline employs a station manager at every airport from which they operate. Station managers are responsible for the coordination of that airline's flights from a particular airport.

Cruise Lines
Cruise operators employ approximately 200,000 people worldwide. Employees work either on-board or ashore.

On-board: The on-board crew of a cruise ship consist of two groups; the ship crew and the hospitality staff.

Ship Crew: All members of the ship crew must have Coast Guard certification and be a graduate of a marine academy. The captain is in charge of the crew aboard a ship. He/she is responsible for the operation of the ship and the safety of the crew and passengers. The captain has a number of officers who assist him/her. Officers begin their career as third mate and receive promotions in line with performance.

Engineers are responsible for the maintenance of the ship. They are required to have studied engineering at a marine academy. The purser is responsible for the ship's paperwork and for handling money. The purser has a great deal of contact with ship passengers as they handle traveller’s checks and assist with customs and immigration requirements.

Hospitality Staff: The hospitality staff typically consists of an accommodation manager, various assistant managers, food and beverage staff, a cruise director, social and recreational staff and housekeeping staff. Most positions are available to people with relevant experience.

People who aspire to management positions should have a college degree in hotel and restaurant management in combination with practical experience in various industry operations. To become a part of a cruise ship’s hotel crew, one should apply through the cruise operator’s office on-shore.

On-shore staff: Cruise operators’ on-shore staff consists of sales and administration staff. Entry-level sales representatives are involved in selling cruise packages through tour operators and retail travel agents. With good performance staff can be promoted to sales supervisor or to the marketing department.

END OF UNIT:
Careers in Tourism - 1