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Management of a Violent or Armed Patient

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    Tashika B.
    US
    Tashika B.

    Very simple to apply techniques.

    Peter Awuni A.
    GH
    Peter Awuni A.

    Mention four challenges of restraints

    Jessica K.
    GB
    Jessica K.

    I don't agree with restraining a patient if they are having hallucinations, because they are going to be scared and distressed anyway, jumping on top of them and restraining them is going to stress them out a lot more, you should try talking to them and trying to calm them down, talking therapy is a lot more positive and natural cure.

    Nicola H.
    GB
    Nicola H.

    some good ideas here

    Martin O.
    UG
    Martin O.

    I didn't know "keep talking and allow no long silences to develop" is one way of managing an armed violent patient.

    Omowunmi Sarah R.
    SZ
    Omowunmi Sarah R.

    This is course is really interesting, indeed its an eye opener

    Samsondeen Abiodun L.
    NG
    Samsondeen Abiodun L.

    Good technical clue

    Kathryn C.
    CA
    Kathryn C.

    It would definitely be frightening to manage violent behaviour, however it is good to be prepared for the event.

    Douglas R.
    US
    Douglas R.

    Double litter restraint is a serious way to hold down a patient.

    Robbyn Michelle Y.
    CA
    Robbyn Michelle Y.

    excellent information -hopefully this will not be something I will need to utilize.

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