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Institutions and segregation

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    Tashika B.
    US
    Tashika B.

    The media and those of us that watch this type of media, fuels the deception of mental illnesses. EDUCATE OURSELVES!

    Peter Awuni A.
    GH
    Peter Awuni A.

    What is the impact of segregation in mental patient recovery

    Kathy L.
    US
    Kathy L.

    Thank goodness for progress, but there is still a huge stigma.

    Darrell L.
    US
    Darrell L.

    The idea of more humane treatment towards the mentally ill was definitely a brave and revolutionary step. However, the segregation and public fear of the mentally ill created asylums that allowed for testing and "control and punishment" treatment by doctors. Possibly out of fear themselves or out of a sense of power over another person. The Retreat in York, built by the Quakers appeared to be more humane and geared towards assisting these individuals with mental illnesses. The asylums built later, appeared to be more for the general public and for the individuals who did not know how to care for their mentally ill family members. These asylums do not appear to be for the curing treatment and mental well being of the individual placed in these asylums.

    Dominic M.
    KE
    Dominic M.

    today such institutions are run by proffessionals and within hospitals .

    Peter M.
    AU
    Peter M.

    While the reading does not explore in depth how the community and its oganisations dealt with mental illness prior to the 19th century I suspect the following. Those people having mental health issues were considered evil or possessed of the devil, I can envisage many attempts to exorcise the evil forces and the torture involved. I assume that being confined in chains and cellars to be the accepted norm with a minimum of care. The 19th century saw the change toward those living in poverty, the sick and the infirm with Christians, especially the Protestants seeing assisting these people as the Christians burden. It was the time of the Protestant work ethic and the devil finds trouble for idle hands. In England there was the beginning of a new middle class that did not want to be confronted with unseemly behavior or the sight of the poor or deformed and there were numerous cries to clean up the streets. It was the time of the Poor Laws and Work Houses in England as it dealt with those marginalised by the changes in society. Social Institutions were established to both provide a modicum of care but also to confine and control and remove from public gaze. There was never a shortage of people to fill these institutions and they grew in number and capacity. People spent their whole life confined to that institution and apart from family visits had no contact with the outside world and there only learning was around Christian principles. There was no attempt at social rehabilitation because there was no intent for them to rejoin the community. As time progressed and medicine progressed some treatments improved but it was still a whole of life in isolation from the community.

    Nicola H.
    GB
    Nicola H.

    I think that at the time keeping people in institutions may have sounded like a good idea, but with hindsight it was the wrong way to treat people.

    Marietta B.
    US
    Marietta B.

    completed

    Martin O.
    UG
    Martin O.

    I believe people with mental health problems were institutionalised and segregated because there was very little or no evidence that they were not possessed of the devil.

    Martin O.
    UG
    Martin O.

    We have really come a long way in as far as Mental Health is concerned. Imagine, in the past, "Many inmates...became certified paupers as well as certified lunatics!" (Parker, Chapter 7: The Persistent Image, p.66). It is sad to read this.

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