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Laws of Nature
The Universe has a fundamental order. The Universe is governed by discrete
and precise laws of nature.

These laws are universal, unchangeable, and omnipresent.The human organism is
ultimately controlled by these laws of physics and chemistry:

Gravitational force and mass

Space and time

Physical states of matter

Pressure gradients

Gravitational Force and Mass
Gravitational force: As you stand upon the surface of the Earth, your
body and its parts experience the force called gravity. The measure of this force is
called weight. Gravity is one type of gravitational force, a force which attracts all
particles and bodies to each other. Gravity acts upon your body during every instant of
your life.

Mass: If you were standing on the surface of the Moon, you would weigh
1/6 of your weight on Earth, but your mass would remain the same. Mass is an intrinsic
property of a particle or object that determines its response to a given force. In a given
location, the weight of an object depends upon its mass.

Space and Time
Each individual occupies a certain amount of space. We exist over a span of time. During
the passage of time, we change--from an infant, to a child, to an adult, to an adult of advance
age.

Physical States of Matter
The matter around and in us exists in several states. These various
states generally reflect the closeness of the molecules that make up the matter.

Solid: The most compact organization is the solid, which retains its specific form and shape.
Liquid: Liquids tend to flow but still stay together.
Gas: Gases also flow but are widely spread and will readily dissipate in many directions.

Pressure Gradients
Substances that flow (gases and liquids) flow in very specific directions.
They flow from an area of higher pressure or concentration to an area of lower pressure or
concentration as long as the two areas are freely interconnected. The difference in pressures of
two interconnected areas is called a pressure gradient. When plotted on graph paper, it is in the form of a slope. The greater the difference, the steeper is the slope and the faster the material flows.