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Interviews

Introduction

The best interviews follow a structured framework in which each applicant is asked the same questions and is scored with a consistent rating process. Having a common set of information about the applicants upon which to compare after all the interviews have been conducted allows hiring managers to avoid prejudices and all interviewees are ensured a fair chance.

Many companies choose to use several rounds of screening with different interviewers to discover additional facets of the applicant’s attitude or skill as well as develop a more well rounded opinion of the applicant from diverse perspectives.

There are two common types of interviews: behavioral and situational.

Behavioral interviews

In a behavioral interview, the interviewer asks the applicant to reflect on his or her past experiences. After deciding what skills are needed for the position, the interviewer will ask questions to find out if the candidate possesses these skills. The purpose of behavioral interviewing is to find links between the job’s requirement and how the applicant’s experience and past behaviors match those requirements.

Examples of behavioral interview questions:

Describe a time when you were faced with a stressful situation. How did you handle the situation?

Give me an example of when you showed initiative and assumed a leadership role?
Situational interviews

A situational interview requires the applicant to explain how he or she would handle a series of hypothetical situations. Situational-based questions evaluate the applicant’s judgment, ability, and knowledge. Before administering this type of interview, it is a good idea for the hiring manager to consider possible responses and develop a scoring key for evaluation purposes.

Examples of situational interview questions:

You and a colleague are working on a project together; however, your colleague fails to do his agreed portion of the work. What would you do?

A client approaches you and claims that she has not received a payment that supposedly had been sent five days ago from your office. She is very angry. What would you do?