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The relationship between stress and disease

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    Tashika B.
    US
    Tashika B.

    I definitely overstand the cause and effect of stress and disease.

    Peter Awuni A.
    GH
    Peter Awuni A.

    Do coping ability vary?

    Darrell L.
    US
    Darrell L.

    The diseases listed are caused from stress; can it be considered that those diseases would not exist otherwise without stress? What I mean is, are these diseases only present where stress is a factor?

    Darrell L.
    US
    Darrell L.

    Is there any stage in the three stages of stress that can be prevented in order to prevent exhaustion or disease?

    Melissa Stephanie A.
    GB
    Melissa Stephanie A.

    It shows such a very detailed impact of the damage that happens to the human body when under stress and millions believe it is only a mental issue and all part of the persons ability to cope mentally, this is the truth of how the stress takes over the whole system within the body, it does impact mentally which then impacts on the body and also causes damage which may be can be cured but if there is physical weakness it could obviously do such damage that could result in death. This should be made more accessible to raise peoples awareness of how it could impact.

    Abdulkadir Ahmed O.
    BD
    Abdulkadir Ahmed O.

    stress can cause a disease in our body

    Odongo M.
    UG
    Odongo M.

    Psychology -> The relationship between stress and disease The relationship between stress and disease the relationship between stress and disease Prolonged, intense stress has also been related to illnesses such as psychosomatic disorders. These are illnesses in which psychological factors play a part in producing actual damage to the body or changes in how the body functions. There are a number of illnesses thought to be psychosomatic such as bronchial asthma, high blood pressure, migraine headaches, stomach ulcers, arthritis, heart disease, hives and other disorders associated with over arousal of the autonomic nervous system. the general adaptation syndrome One of the major contributors to stress research was Hans Selye (1956) who identified and described the General Adaptation Syndrome (GAS). After he exposed rats to a large number of physical and psychological stressors, he concluded that all stressors produced essentially the same pattern of results. He believes the reactions to prolonged stress consists of three stages: alarm: where the individual is mobilised for action resistance: the individual attempts to cope with the threat through fight or flight exhaustion: the individual is unable to overcome the threat and the energy resources have been depleted through attempts to reduce the threat. This stage is associated with signs of physical wear and tear, especially in organ systems that were weak in the first place or heavily involved in the resistance process Seyle's model of stress has been very influential but it underestimated the role of psychological factors, such as emotional factors or the way a person thinks about stressors. Psychobiological models of stress emphasise the importance of psychological as well as biological variables in regulating and producing stress responses.

    Toni M.
    CA
    Toni M.

    stress can do a number on your body by playing with our mind and body

    Dominic M.
    KE
    Dominic M.

    prolonged stressors can cause illnessess and methods to overcome them should be devised to save the victim.

    Dominic M.
    KE
    Dominic M.

    is there a particular cure for stress a process?

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