The Use/Evaluation Phase: auditing the system
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The Use/Evaluation Phase: auditing the system

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    Zinabie Tadesse G.
    ET
    Zinabie Tadesse G.

    The final phase of the system design life cycle is used to evaluate the new or modified information system. This phase involves monitoring, evaluating and maintaining the system. The system is evaluated to determine how effectively it meets the objectives outlined in the preliminary investigation.

    Zinabie Tadesse G.
    ET
    Zinabie Tadesse G.

    What are the types of Evaluation ?

    Zinabie Tadesse G.
    ET
    Zinabie Tadesse G.

    Whenever the word "efficiency" pops up, you should automatically be thinking: "time, money, effort/labour". So let's use them as a structure for an answer. To evaluate time efficiency, you could look at the time taken to: start the system enter data process data produce output communicate information maintain the hardware and software. To evaluate economic efficiency, you could look at the costs of: initial purchase costs of hardware, software, installation, consultancy training and documentation wages consumables repairs, upgrades, maintenance, service contracts interest rates, leasing costs To evaluate labour efficiency, you could look at: the number of staff required to operate the new system (e.g. the old system may have required 2 people, whereas the new system only requires 1 person) the number of man-hours spent operating the system (e.g. the new payroll system may take half the time to process weekly pay runs than did the original system. ffectiveness is a measure of how well a job is done, regardless of the time, money and effort poured into it. It determines how well a systems intended goals have been satisfied. These goals are set down in a logical design during the analysis phase.

    Ahmed Sayed A.
    EG
    Ahmed Sayed A.

    In this area a continual monitoring process should be in place to ensure that the system is producing accurate information. In systems where there are no mandatory audits required, often the company will create checks of its own to ensure the accuracy of information being produced. A common example of this would be a stock take where the stock levels on the shelves are compared with the information contained within the system to ensure accuracy. These audits of the system will be built into the standard operating procedures of the company.

    Khan Agha S.
    AF
    Khan Agha S.

    In this area a continual monitoring process should be in place to ensure that the system is producing accurate information. In systems where there are no mandatory audits required, often the company will create checks of its own to ensure the accuracy of information being produced.

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