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An Explanation of the Drawing Systems: Orthogonal

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Graphic Design -> An Explanation of the Drawing Systems: Orthogonal

Orthogonal

There are two conventions in orthogonal drawing: 1st and 3rd angle. The most common of these, and the style generally chosen for this outcome, is the 3rd angle; and so this is the one most commonly represented in this section.

It is important to dimension your drawing so that you learn the conventions of this area. Issues such as how far the dimensions should be placed from the object, which dimensions go on the outside, how curves and circles are represented and in what direction the measurements are placed are all issues that can be resolved through this drawing. It is also recommended that you have a range of technical pens or felt-tipped pens for the presentation of this task. The thickest (0.7mm or 0.5mm) are used for the object; a smaller size for hidden lines and the smallest for the dimensions.

Try to avoid circular objects for orthogonal drawings, as many will only allow you to represent the top and front views. Whilst this is the correct convention, you will not be gaining sufficient experience in the more common practice of drawing three aligned views of the one object.

In this drawing, the student has represented a chair in three aligned views. Some hidden lines are represented, as are the dimensions of the actual chair. It should be observed that the overall dimensions are placed on the outer edge, with the smaller dimensions being placed on the inside of them. It is recommended that at least 8-10 dimensions be shown so that you can indicate your understanding of this convention. Remember that no dimension should be mentioned twice.

This is a drawing that shows three aligned views of a spaceship design. You will notice that no hidden lines are shown here, due to the complexity of the outer shape. A cross-sectional view of a part of the object would be appropriate if the internal structure was to be represented.

This is a professionally drawn orthogonal representation of a deck chair.