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Module 1: Coleridge Frost at Midnight

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XSIQ
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English - Poetic form

Poetic form

Just as Coleridge only knows that the fire is still alive by the
fluttering film, so too, we are only aware of the village and the world in
general being "alive" because of the poet's active consciousness:

' ITS MOTION IN THIS HUSH OF NATURE
Gives it dim sympathies with me who live,
MAKING IT A COMPANIONABLE FORM,' (ll.17-19)

These lines demonstrate Coleridge's mastery of poetic form. Notice the
vowel sounds in l. 18 - Gives it dim sympathies with me who live. The
dominant vowel is the short "i" sound, but amongst it is the isolated long
"e" in "me". In other words, the word "me" stands literally in isolation in
this line, just as the poet himself (who is, of course, the actual "me" of
the line) is similarly an isolated consciousness in the world of the poem.
"Me" stands alone against the background sounds, just as the film does
against the ashy grate and just as the poet's mind does against the quiet
of the background world.

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