Loading

Module 1: Coleridge This Lime-Tree Bower, My Prison

Notes
Study Reminders
Support
Text Version

Concluding remarks

Set your study reminders

We will email you at these times to remind you to study.
  • Monday

    -

    7am

    +

    Tuesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Wednesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Thursday

    -

    7am

    +

    Friday

    -

    7am

    +

    Saturday

    -

    7am

    +

    Sunday

    -

    7am

    +

XSIQ
*

English - Concluding remarks

Concluding remarks

What did Coleridge learn during the process of writing the poem? He
learnt that the beauty of Nature is available in every natural area, no
matter how small.

Effectively what Coleridge learns from here is a lesson that the beauty of
Nature is available in every 'PLOT' (l.61), and that every natural area, no
matter how small, is capable of awakening a sense of 'LOVE AND BEAUTY'
(ll.61-64). This realisation, in its turn, leads to Coleridge reflecting on
the very process of this poem:

'and sometimes '
Tis well to be bereft of promis'd good,
That we may lift the soul, and contemplate
With lively joy the joys we cannot share' (ll.64-67)

From here, the poem moves in its systolic beat, to focus on Charles, as
Coleridge imagines that he and Charles may be viewing the same rook
currently crossing the face of the setting sun and thus, again, are unified
in the present moment:

'when the last rook
Beats its straight path along the dusky air
Homewards, I blest it! deeming its black wing....
...Had cross'd the mighty Orb's dilated glory,
WHILE THOU STOOD'ST GAZING...
.......................... and had a charm
For thee, my gentle-hearted Charles, to whom
NO SOUND IS DISSONANT WHICH TELLS OF LIFE.' (ll.68-76)

Even a rook can be beautiful, and the poem ends on a note of acknowledging
the beauty of life itself.

Previous | Next