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Module 1: Coleridge This Lime-Tree Bower, My Prison

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Similarities to Frost at Midnight

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English - Similarities to Frost at Midnight

Similarities to Frost at Midnight

The connection of the tract with steeples is another of Coleridge's
linking of Nature and God, as he is to do in _Frost at Midnight._ Another
connection with _Frost at Midnight_ is the disparity between the city and
the world of nature represented by the English countryside. In this poem,
it is Charles Lamb who has been "captive" in the "City pent", and it this
history that we see in the next section of the poem as the focus narrows
right down again to the sole figure of Charles Lamb:

'My gentle-hearted Charles! for thou hast pined
And hunger'd after Nature, many a year,
IN THE GREAT CITY PENT...' (ll.28-30)

Note how the placement of the word "pined" and its resonances with Nature
places emphasis on it and implicitly links Nature itself to the sorrow of
Charles. It is the solace of natural beauty that is emphasised above all in
this section of the poem as Coleridge imagines the scene now facing his
friend and addresses Nature directly so that Charles may be comforted and
renewed:

'Ah! slowly sink
Behind the western ridge, thou glorious Sun!
Shine in the slant beams of the sinking orb,
YE PURPLE HEATH-FLOWERS! RICHLIER BURN, YE CLOUDS!' (ll.32-35)

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