Loading

Module 1: Coleridge This Lime-Tree Bower, My Prison

Notes
Study Reminders
Support
Text Version

Systolic movement

Set your study reminders

We will email you at these times to remind you to study.
  • Monday

    -

    7am

    +

    Tuesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Wednesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Thursday

    -

    7am

    +

    Friday

    -

    7am

    +

    Saturday

    -

    7am

    +

    Sunday

    -

    7am

    +

XSIQ
*

English - Systolic movement

Systolic movement

In the systolic movement that characterises the Conversation poems,
Coleridge's opening self-consciousness pans out, using imagination, to his
friends and their present situation:

Click on GO and read the extract as you watch and listen:

Well, they are gone, and here must I remain,
This lime-tree bower my prison! I have lost
Beauties and feelings, such as would have been
Most sweet to my remembrance even when age
Has dimm'd mine eyes to blindness !
They meanwhile Friends, whom I never more may meet again,
On springy heath, along the hill-top edge,
WANDER IN GLADNESS' (ll.1-8)

From here Coleridge's focus zooms in on aspects of the landscape to a
minute detailed description of the landscape. Keep in mind as you read this
that Coleridge is still in his prison-bower, and that the unity achieved
with his friends is through imagination:

The roaring dell, o'erwooded, narrow, deep,
And only speckled by the mid-day sun;
Where its slim trunk the ash from rock to rock
Flings arching like a bridge; - that branchless ash,
Unsunn'd and damp, whose few poor yellow leaves
Ne'er tremble in the gale, yet tremble still,
FANN'D BY THE WATERFALL!' (ll.10-16)

Previous | Next