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Module 1: Introduction to Samuel Coleridge

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XSIQ
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1798 - 1810

1798 - 1810

Use your mouse to explore some of the pivotal events of Coleridge's life


Coleridge was to enter the church to make a living, but an annuity of 150
given him by Thomas and Josiah Wedgwood in 1798 freed him to be able to
write poetry. By this time he had met William Wordsworth and the great
literary partnership began. Wordsworth and his sister moved to be near the
Coleridges at Nether Stowey in Somersetshire. In 1798 the pair published
_Lyrical Ballads_, designed to revolutionise the style and subject matter
of English poetry and it was between July 1797 and July 1798 that Coleridge
wrote his greatest poems: _'Kubla Khan', 'Frost at midnight', 'Christabel',
'France: an ode' _and _'The rime of the ancient marine_r'.

From 1799, he was writing regular political articles for the _Morning
Post_. In 1800 Coleridge moved to the Lake District with the Wordsworths
and they prepared a new edition of the _Lyrical Ballads_, though Wordsworth
omitted 'Christabel', leading to Coleridge's increasing lack of confidence
in himself - a problem compounded by his failing marriage and love for Sara
Hutchinson, a friend of Wordsworth's. By now he was also addicted to opium,
and this addiction was deepened by various sojourns abroad. He returned to
England in 1806, and finally separated from Sarah Fricker. He returned to
journalism at this time and friends gathered around financially, though he
fell out with Wordsworth in 1810 over his addiction.

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