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Module 1: Comedy Writing

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Writing - Comedy writing 3

Comedy writing 3

There are many terms that we apply to the various forms of comedy.

are very short amusing stories that are usually true. Lots of magazines
like_ Reader's Digest_ pay their readers for submitting anecdotes.

Old Aunty Betty from Edinburgh had just got the telephone put on. When she
was speaking to her friend Doris down the street one day, she said in
frustration: "I'm going to disconnect the phone because I never seem to get
you when I call. I use all the numbers and if I forget one I just put it at
the end".

Can you think of an anecdote?

is the ability to express ideas and words in an amusing manner. Oscar
Wilde (1854 - 1899) an Irish playwright, poet and author, was a master of
wit and he is still frequently quoted today. You might like to search the
Internet for some samples of his writing.

Mr and Mrs Smith were walking down the street one day with the latest
addition to their family. When their neighbour Mrs Jones said: "Mr Smith,
what a beautiful baby!" Mr Smith replied: "Thank you Mrs Jones, if you like
I could do the same for you."

Lady Astor: "Winston, if I were your wife I'd put poison in your coffee."

Winston Churchill: "Nancy, if I were your husband I'd drink it."

is a comic imitation of someone or something. Parody is used when
comedians make puppets of famous figures and poke fun at them.

are humorous poems that are five lines long. The first, second and fifth
lines rhyme as do the third and fourth lines.

A jolly old fellow named Hugh,

Was arrested for saying: "Look; snoo!"

"What's snoo?" They would cry,

And he'd always reply,

"Oh, nothing much; What's new with you?"

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