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Guide to Play and Improvise on a Piano

Advanced Piano Chords

Okay so before moving on to actually showing you how to use the piano and how to you know start improvising i want to talk a little bit more about advanced chords uh just to let you be aware of them not telling you to use them just letting you be aware of them so like i'm saying i've been playing piano uh for four to five years producing music for longer and i'm still only you know using like you know basic basic chords however uh a chord that i have started to use more often is the suspend a suspended fourth and suspended second so right here if we have uh a c major okay so with e in the middle so on the one three and five so c e and g a suspended fourth is you just move the e to the f so you just move up one and then the suspended second you actually go down one so you're playing the d but just to show you that you now i was playing the suspended uh second and the suspended fourth uh just to bring out some variety in my chords another one that you will typically see a lot is
seven so like a major seventh and a minor seventh again like i'm saying i've been playing piano for you know quite a while now and i'm not even really using those chords tons so don't feel that you have to learn all this stuff right now in this course i am wanting to keep this very very simple for you but still break down how a piano works and how to create beautiful piano pieces you know with your beats and hopefully by the end of this course you'll at least understand how to improvise on the piano and then it is up to you to practice all this you're going to see i'm going to break it down for you so our next section we are getting into actually how to play the piano so hopefully you guys have been learning a lot so far let's get into it.

Chords Progression for Beat Making

All right so now that all the theory is out of the way in terms of you know like what is a piano how does it work the notes uh scales chords now that you have a general idea of what they are now it's time to put them to use and actually learn how to play the piano okay so we're going to start in the scale of c major so again that's only white notes and we're going to play four chords in one of my favorite chord progressions uh depending on what chord progression you use it kind of gives you a different emotion and as you'll hear through this chord progression it's very very powerful very very emotional so i'll play it and then i'll show you what notes we played within the chords okay so it goes c it goes g it goes a and then it goes to f the first chord is c major so your thumb which is your one is on c your middle finger your three which is on e and then your pinky your five is on g so that's c major then we go down to g major so your thumb is on g your middle finger's on b and your pinky is on d and then you go up to a minor so uh your thumb is on a your middle finger's on c and then your pinky is on e and then you go down to f and this is f major so your thumb is on f your middle finger's on a and then your pinky is on c okay so we'll play that again so c major g major a minor and then f major and you could play that with both hands okay so you know c major g major a minor and then f major so before moving on to the next video just make sure to practice these chords learning the piano is all about muscle memory it's all about playing those chords and knowing where they are and then in our next video we're going to get into timing which again all relates to this muscle memory the more you practice the more it becomes natural to you okay so practice it and i'll see you in the next video which we cover the timing of chords.

Timings Variations in Piano Playing

So now I'm going to show you how to play those chords with different timings. Okay. So in a later video, I show you in your music program in FL studio, in our case, uh, different timings for your chords. Cause it's a lot easier to click things in, but in this video, I'm going to show you how to just kind of start practicing. We're going to start with some basic counting. With your cords. And then I'm going to show you just kind of one advanced way of counting with chords as well. So we're going to use those same chords, the C the G the a and the F. And we're going to count it like one, two, three, four, and then you change your chord, you know, one, two, three, four, change your cord. This would be a good way for you guys to practice again. It's all about like, building like that muscle memory. So one, two, three G one, two, three, eight. One, two, three F one, two, three in the backup to see, and you can just kind of keep practicing that all around. And then if you wanted to kind of get creative, uh, and stretch your practicing, you can start implementing, uh, Your inversions, you know, so on the first time around, you can use like, just like the root position of C and then the next time around, you can change up the progression. So for example, like, you know, one, two, three G one, two, three, one, two, three, F one, two, three in the backup to see, and then instead of playing it like this, you could play it like this, like, and then he'd go back down just to give you ideas. He is on how to practice. And now the next way for counting is instead of one, two, three, four, because sometimes I can get very, very boring. Um, you can go one and two. And like we were talking about before, so on the second and fourth chord, I'm going to change it up on the end, after two, so one and two, and, and right there, I would change chord. So for example, what we're starting to see. So one and two and three and four and one and two and three ad four ad.So that's just a way to kind of count and practice different chords. Um, in our later videos, I'm going to show you, you know, how you can kind of practice different chords, different chord progressions, but for the time being, keep practicing this, it will soak in and over your days, weeks and months of practicing, you'll start to find that that stuff's getting super, super easy. So let's get into the next video where you kind of get to learn how to play around.

Right-hand Tips

So in this video we're going to be covering how to improvise with your right hand okay so how to kind of play around hit different notes as your left hand is playing uh the chord progression now this will be a little hard to teach because improvisation you know it's kind of like it's improvising you're trying to find things that suit what's going on but i can guide you in the general direction of what you're looking for and what's possible and then from there you can start trying different things out so to start with we're going to continue in our chord progression c g a and f and now as you hit your left hand chord so in our case would be c what you can be hitting with your right hand is really anything in this c major scale like you could be hitting any of these notes um you know for example just a little example but here's a rule of thumb that i like to do uh that i always kind of find works good for my tracks in this chord you have three notes right you have a c an e and a g and then when you go down to g you have you know the g the b and the d so i kind of think it's like well i can use any of these three notes for my improvisation so if we go to c we're gonna hit c a couple of times and then let's go g a couple of times so and then let's go down to g so now let's hit g a couple times and then d a couple
times and then same with a so now i'm gonna hit a couple times and then i'm gonna hit e a couple times because that is in the a minor chord right so and then we're gonna gonna go down to f now so we'll hit f a couple times and we'll hit c a couple times so all we did there was we were just playing notes within the chord when we were going on that chord progression because remember we already counted so like one two three four one two three four so in our right hand when we go to c we can play any of those notes in c go down to g any of the notes in g but at the same time that's kind of restrictive because it's like well are those the only notes you can hit and no they're you know it's definitely not like i'm saying since we're in the scale of c major this is what's awesome because these are all the notes that are available to you as you're playing your chord progression so for example like we could just keep our right hand in the c chord and keep changing on our left hand the chord progressions so if we go c and then down to g so my right hand is still in the c chord right and then up to a and then maybe on this time around instead of going c and then g i'll go something like that so everything that i've been telling you all along it should all be lining up right so i picked the scale of c major it's only white notes so these are all the notes that are available to me and i actually just stayed in the c major chord with the right hand and then i just kept changing the progression with my left hand for some of it you can comb down here like you know at this c5 and then you can also maybe bounce up here to c6 so going back to like the theory videos i was talking to you about like the suspended second and the suspended fourth so for example i will play something here so as you can see there i played like that suspended second and then suspended fourth so what i'm trying to say is you don't just have to hit like the single notes you can play single notes you can play kind of uh variations of chords uh different chords over you know different left-hand chords so i hope that kind of opens up your eyes and
gives you just a general idea of how you can start using your right hand for improvisation you know i'm not going to go and play like mary had a little lamb with you and stuff like that but if you apply the theory that i've been showing you again white notes those these are the only notes that are available to you you have chords so you you find a chord progression that you like with your left hand and then you can start hitting any of these notes since we're in c major any of these white notes and it's up to you to kind of find well what what sounds good and it will only happen over time i'll keep saying it over and over it's that muscle memory it's something that you are going to have to sit down at least two or three times a week um and just sit down for 10 minutes and just practice this so in our next video we're going to be getting into using the left hand i'm going to uh introduce to you guys some left hand techniques ones that i have found over the years because i've always found like the left hand to be the trickiest in terms of being able to blend it with the right hand i was able to progress quite well with my right hand i was able to kind of start bouncing around but i always found my left hand was holding me back and even still to date i wish my left hand i was able to do more and i was able to blend it and be more creative with it but i'm going to share with you a lot of the left-hand techniques that i found over the years just to add a fullness to your piano pieces and especially when it comes to composing your beats these are things that add fullness they're just like the extra note here and there or the extra kind of filler okay so let's get into the left hand techniques.

Left-hand Techniques

Okay so in this video we're gonna cover a bunch of different left hand techniques that you can implement to make your piano pieces sound fuller just so you're not always stuck playing chord chord chord and chord so you can kind of add some kind of filler stuff in so the first one i'm going to talk about is adding in just like a single late note so as we play our chord before you leave to the next chord you just play the top end of that chord before going down so for example in c you would play g again before going down to g and then you'd play d again before going up to a and then you play e again before going down to f and then c so for example it'd be like so just adds just a little bit of fullness that one's just a little kind of quick one that's typically really good for bass lines uh if you're creating you know bass lines for your beats and then the next one is adding in a few more notes so it's kind of building off of like that late note but instead of just adding one note you can add in a couple late notes and i can kind of think of it as rolling down or even rolling up or being random with it so that it's just not always so consistent so for example i'll play the c chord here and then near the end of our counting we would kind of roll down and then go down to g so it'd kind of be like one two three and then one two three and then we'll go up and then a and then let's roll down and then f so do that a little faster without counting just because i can play better that way so to kind of be something like this and now for my next one is uh you can just be tapping the left hand as you are counting on b so for example you'd play the chord on every single beat with the left hand be like okay and then again now you can start adding in like those light notes so you know and then it would just repeat so as you can see our progressions keep getting a little bit fuller with each technique that i'm showing you here okay and you can mix and match and blend all these ones that i've shown you so far to start getting fullness and these are things you're just gonna have to kind of keep practicing with your left hand now to build off of like the tapping instead of playing every single beat this is where that syncopation can come in so it can be like so if i try and play that with counting it'd be like one and two and three and four and one and two and three and four and one and two and three and four and one and two and three and four again it's kind of offbeat it's what you call syncopation and it adds you know it has such a unique sound in music and it adds such fullness like by itself it's just it kind of has silence and silence is something that you do want in your productions but you want to be adding the silence in at the right times so don't forget about silence okay a lot of times you want to try and add as much in to make it as full as possible but silence is a tool that we as producers use to add uh emotion okay and the next one i want to show you is like the arpeggio and this adds tons and tons of fullness this one is going to open up your eyes to how to blend in the left and right hand a lot fuller um this is kind of like a crutch though so don't get comfy with it don't make it a habit but just keep it in mind and it doesn't have to just be these notes like you can start adding in other notes in your arpeggio so instead of playing the e i'm adding in the upper c and what you're going to do is you're just going to go c g c okay so now watch if i play this and i go down to g so now in g we're removing the b but we're adding the g up higher okay and then the a we are removing the c but we're moving the a up higher same with f just to go over this with you so we have f we're moving a and we're keeping the c but then we're adding the f up higher so now watch listen to this when i play this sounds very very very full right very beautiful now if i were to play the right hand cord with that arpeggio i'll just play up here just like my hands don't clash and again to be creative you don't have to be playing like the c you know you could be going like to a or you could even go from c g c and then don't come back to the g you can go to like a different note like maybe f or maybe a or you know that's where the arpeggio and that's where the creativeness comes in so that's been a big one now to build off of this you don't have to use it as an arpeggio either you can also play like the block chords kind of like a static chord but the reason why i like this sometimes again not all the time it's about variety in your music i'm just throwing things out there for creativity on the left hand with you so the reason why i like removing the e in this case so like the three the middle and adding an octave higher is because it adds that fullness and it kind of helps with a cleaner mix but you're still getting fullness by you know with three notes on your left hand so you don't have to play as an arpeggio you can play it as the block chords too so if i go like c and then down to g and then up to a and then down to f so like i was saying you can kind of mix and match these techniques that i've been throwing at you and kind of blend them together when you want so for example with this arpeggio you could be adding in like those late notes and kind of those filler notes to make your arpeggio sound fuller just so it's just not again so static sounding so for example i'll just play
just the left hand without the right hand it'd be like okay so those are some helpful tips that i have found over my years of my left hand in the next video i'm gonna go over a little song that i've created in c minor using the arpeggio as well as blending a little bit of the right hand i'm gonna teach you the song and you guys can practice it i've actually used the song uh in one of my beat tapes it's called giving in is giving up there'll be more information in our next video so soak all this stuff in there's a lot to take in but you guys can mix and match that left-hand stuff and blend it with your right hand again it's just gonna take practice but these are the things that i can pass on to you to help your improvisation uh go that much faster so let's get into the next video where you're gonna learn a little song that i've created.

Play Piano with Both Hands

Okay so the song i'm gonna show you to play is the song i've created and it was actually off of one of my beat tapes uh free beats by gratitude as volume four from time to time i just released beat tapes and this song name was actually called giving in is giving up i just created a little piano piece and that was the beat where i use this piano piece now i created this in c minor so we're going to pure minor so this is following everything i've shown you all along okay so the chord progression is c g sharp d sharp a sharp okay and i do it as an arpeggio so i'm first going to play the song for you first just so you can kind of hear it and then i will show you how to play it as you can see on the left hand i have the arpeggio stuff going on and once i get to the last chord in the progression i change it up a little bit which i'll show you and then the right hand has its own little melody which kind of follows a little bit of the arpeggio too so the first chord in the progression is c and i go c g and c i don't go back to g so it goes and then i go right to g sharp so it goes g sharp d sharp g sharp go back to d sharp and then back to g sharp so okay and then we go down to d sharp d sharp a sharp d sharp and then i go up to a sharp now this is where i've changed up my arpeggio so it goes so it goes a sharp f a sharp
g and then f okay so if we do that together so c g c g sharp d sharp g sharp d sharp g sharp and then d sharp a sharp d sharp and then up to a sharp f a sharp so i'll play it a little faster okay so now on the right hand how it works is i i mostly just stay around d sharp a lot i also hit a sharp and then i also hit the g and the f once i add in the same notes as the arpeggio so it kind of goes like and that's how it goes so if we add both hands together now we're going to start at c and i hold down the d sharp when i start with c so now i go down to g sharp and i hit the d sharp again now when i go back down i'm hitting a sharp with the d sharp and i hit the d sharp when i hit the g sharp so it goes okay okay so here we go now i hit the d sharp again when i go to the next chord and then we go to a sharp i hit it again now when i come back down and hit g f that's when i hit g and f here so on the first time around i think i just hit g and f but on the second time around that's when it goes okay it's kind of like the offbeat so let's start from c here again holding down d sharp d sharp again now this is where i hit a sharp and then d sharp now do it again now this is where i add in like the offbeat the syncopation and that's that's it that's the song okay so if i add those together and then at the end there i just hit this note uh when it goes and then that would just bring me into the verse this is how it would go so do and then back into the chorus and over my years you know i always just try to play around with that and kind of use that uh for improvisation and learn how to kind of add in little filler notes here and there because music's all about like timing that muscle memory and hopefully you know you can kind of see my keyboard good in this video that nothing's kind of confusing um and yeah hopefully you guys learned my song giving in is giving up in our next video we're going to kind of get into like learning about uh to keep like your progressions fresh and also different uh ways you can be playing like your chords of timing and stuff like that.