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An Overview of the Course

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This tutorial is intended to do a deep dive into the standard functionality relating to accounts payable in SAP S four HANA. I will use the very latest fury apps where possible, but on occasion may include the odd classic dewy transaction for information. Many companies have migrated from previous let's say systems. And have certain processes in place that they don't want to change. So in addition to the official SAP best practice, I do cover some alternatives. Although I go into the detail to demonstrate, for example, how to post or pay an invoice. I also cover the why's and wherefores so that both managers and end-users can understand the whole flow in detail and the importance of not just pushing an invoice through for payment. But also taking care of it. The correct process is followed to ensure that areas such as C accruals costs and stocks are also updated correctly. I C P S for HANA is changing very fast pace. So even as I speak new functionalities appearing, you may find therefore that your system looks slightly different. So I indicate the fury app ID I'm using where relevant. And show you how to check this on your system and in the fury apps library. Sometimes I mentioned that certain functionality is not currently available, but by the time you watched this tutorial, this may have changed. So it's worth double checking. A few words about me before we start, my name is Suna Flanagan, and I've been implementing and supporting SAP. For for two decades, although I have worked mainly on it as fan road for the last few years, I spent many years working in accounts payable and receivable as finance generally. So understand finance from both the user perspective and as an SAP consultant also written a few books. Three of them are less for HANA as well as various training courses, blogs and webinars. The tutorial is split into seven main sections and each section is further split into sub sections. The first section reintroduce SAP, S four, HANA and fury. And talk a little bit about your SAP best practices. The next section, we'll explain the organizational structure. And the different types of master data that you might come across in accounts payable and how it works in fewer, in particular supply master data. The third section explains the procure to pay process so that when posting a supplier invoice, you understand the related documents and under which circumstances, it may be automatically blocked for payment. I included this section because understanding a little about purchase orders will help you to understand the most efficient way to enter an invoice and also to troubleshoot any discrepancies. You may need to know why the invoice behaves differently. If the purchase order has goods, receipt based, invoice verification selected, for example, and what to do with service entry, sheets, or limit purchase orders. The fourth section explains the different types of invoice and credit notes and how to post them. It's important to choose the correct type of credit note as this has repercussions on what is posted or not posted to the Jr IRA account. Fifth section explains what the gr I R account is how it works and how to maintain it. Although reconciling the GRI or account is maybe a bit advanced for no accounts payable process, perhaps more of a finance or general ledger task. I felt it was important to include it here, to show what happens to the other side of an invoice after it's been posted as well as emphasize how important it is to make adjustments and post credit notes correctly. Also in this section, we'll cover some of the new tools to monitor and reconsolidate the GRI, our account. In the sixth section, we start by talking about some preparations that you can do prior to running the automatic payment program in order to avoid having too many exceptions during the proposal stage. We go through the various steps of the automatic payment run and then cover several other ways to make payments, including manual downpayments. We explain how the bank clearing accounts and the bank reconciliation work, as well as the postings and clearing. We run through some related reports and we cover some tips and tricks. Finally, there's quite a large section on troubleshooting, the automatic payment program. And the second section is all about closing and recording, where possible I would demonstrate using a 1909 SAP S four HANA system and SAP Fiori apps. I would explain later in this section, what those terms mean. Note that if you're not currently using fury, most of the processes are similar and you'll be able to follow much of the tutorial using classic goofy transactions, but she won't have access to some of the functionality, including some of the new fury reports, the master data and transactions, usually the same fields mandatory. That mean the same thing, but the layout may be different in fury and the classic could be transactions. As you can see from the agenda. This section is mostly introducing SAP, S four HANA and fury. I will give a little background and explain the different versions of SAP HANA and what the SAP best practices are. Then I have a couple of quick demos on navigating around the SAP Fiori, launchpad in apps, plus a demo showing some tips and tricks before we go properly into accounts payable in the next section. Just in case you're not convinced about using fury when you can still use the gooey in Esther, Hannah, on premise, I've done a quick comparison of one active fury and its equivalent in the gooey. When I talk about this for Hannah, I usually start by saying in the past, SAP was traditionally known for its flexibility. You could tailor the standard SAP system in a number of different ways to do exactly what you wanted. And if that wasn't enough, you could add bits of your own code in places to enhance it further. This meant, however, the implementing and maintaining the system could get quite complex. There was never sufficient time or resources to swap the old setup with new functionality, you should buy SAP and a lot of regression testing each time. Any upgrades planned historically systems were either designed to be efficient for uses to enter transactions known as online transaction processing or OLTP. Oh, they, but designed for users to extract data easily in the form of reports known as online analytical processing or O L a P, but not both. Hence many organizations used to transfer all the data to a separate system for reporting often overnight. So at month end, you might have to wait 24 hours for adjustments to show in the more complex reports. Thanks to advances in technology and the new in memory HANA database SAP were able to create S for HANA. Although many of the processes appear quite similar. The in-memory part makes it super fast and the new design of the database itself means so that it's efficient for both transactions and real time reporting. In addition this for Hannah, it's all about simplification and returning to a consistent best practice way of doing things, improving many processes and bringing a lot of new improved functionality. There are two main types of SAP, S four HANA. Plus the number of permutations in between. On the one hand you have the cloud essentials, traditionally known as SAP SPL public cloud, which is run on a centrally administered multi tenanted system. Using only fury pay is responsible for all the software, hardware, maintenance, backups, et cetera, making it much cheaper and easier for individual organizations. However quarterly upgrades are mandatory and there's less flexibility to customize the system. On the other hand, you have essentially a very similar version, but where you're in full control, for example, you choose where it's hosted when upgrades are carried out, how it's maintained and you're responsible for the software and hardware and can choose whether to use fury or not. This is now cool desk for Hannah, any premise, but as it was previously always known as on-premise, you will still see the abbreviation. Oop, from premise in SAP documentation, each version of S for HANA is named after the year, month of its release. The version I will be using for most of the demonstrations is a 1909 S for HANA, any premise version. In other words, it was released in September, 2019. It's predecessor was 1809 released in September, 2008 18. And its successor will probably be released in 2020. Although, I believe the naming convention may be changing to show simply the year for on-premise releases, even though I'm using an on-premise system for the most part, the processes and transactions should look fairly similar in fury, even if you're using S for HANA cloud. However, the speed of innovation is very fast at the moment. So sometimes I may be using an earlier or later version of a transaction. SAP best practices. It's not just in general indication of the best way to do something, but a very specific, carefully documented set of processes and related information grouped and published under numbered scope items, the SAP best practices. Explorer has all the detail about each practice. You choose to release, for example, SAP S four HANA on premise 1909, as well as the related country. And then the scope item, scope items form part of the building blocks, which enabled a lot of automation during a new HANA implementation. The main scope item for accounts payable is J 60 and we'll be covering most of the J 60 processes in this tutorial. he best practices Explorer can currently be found at the link on the slide. So now to get to the more fun stuff, fewer is the name of the new user interface or is SAP prefer to call it user experience? In other words, how you access this for HANA fuel resource. So be Italian word for flowers, in case you're wondering the desktop or fewer your launch pad contains individual tiles called fury apps, which take you into the relevant sections. Fury apps can represent transactions. For example, posting an invoice of payment fact sheets, for example, put about supplier information or analytics such as KPIs and reports, by the way they don't actually tumble in in real life is I'll show you shortly in a demo. Although there are currently around 12,000 fury apps in the fury library, the actual number of apps you're likely to use on a daily basis. It's probably very small and your homepage should only contain those apps that you need that said, because I'm working in many areas you can see from the side. But in addition to show example, home page, I have created many additional tabs to quickly access groups of apps that I've put together. Although I can also access the standard SAP group. Yes. We used to previous versions of SAP with the classic gooey menu. You may have used a more complicated menu structure, like on the right of the side to access transactions and reports, and you probably have logged on using a gooey launchpad. Some transaction codes are quite short and easy to remember, or you could save them in your favorites folder. So if for some transactions can be quite long and search the menus to launch a transaction, if it's not in your favorites is quite time consuming. Usually need quite a number of key strokes to find the transaction, then enter the selection criteria and finally execute. When you go into fury, you arrive first at your homepage, which would typically three contain just the transactions or apps you most use, depending on the transaction. You'd already be able to see some figures at a glance without a single keystroke. Some transactions in fury do still call a classic GUI transaction code and look very similar to the Garry transaction, but many are completely new and rewritten specifically. Yes, Hannah. Oh, the way I'm using fury three. So if you're using an earlier version, you may see slight differences. For example, to edit the home page, you need to click on the little me area or person icon. But she's on the right in fury three, but on the left in earlier versions of fury, also, you can now use the SAP logo instead of the home icon in certain places to navigate back to the home page change. I'm going to do a short demo. If your launch pad is mentioned before, When I login, I arrived first at the home page, but can easily move to other groups using the tabs to get back to the home page quickly. I can click on the home button or in some cases I can click on the SAP logo. The reason that you only see my home page apps on my home page and not the other groups, is that I've changed the home page setting in the meat area to show one group at a time. Mainly because I have so many apps and groups that it takes forever to load that in page. If I don't, I can still jump to the groups quite quickly using the tabs or the down arrow or the right. So launch an app. That's not on my home page. I can use the tabs to go to that group to find the app, or I can use the down arrow on the right to go to the group. Two, I think the groups I can go to settings and choose edit homepage. I can create rearrange and delete groups here as well as rename both the groups and the apps. If I don't like the name of an app. Or want to add something to it? For example, I want to remember the oldest pie balances app. I can also drill down to the line items. I can click on the three dots at the bottom, right. With the tire to edit the information. And I did the description, or I did another line to the name of the app. Sometimes editing the homepage can be slow. So I usually find it easier to go to the app find correct. You can find an ad apps quickly without going into edit home page. And I can also create new groups here, although I can't choose which order I want them to appear in here. I will go now to the app finder using the me icon. If I know the name of the app, I'm looking for, I can enter all or parts of it in the search in catalog field. Fix some posts, the PI balances when searching globally for something, remember always to make sure that all is selected on the left-hand side and not the last catalog that you looked at. Yep. So group together in catalogs. So if I don't know the name of the app and I can search in the most likely catalog down the left-hand side, but I have to clear the search field first. I use a lots of catalogs, but you probably won't see anywhere near as many. If you have the fury app ID, you could also check in the fury apps library, which catalog, keep it, say I can click on an app to go directly into it, but then I'll have to search for it again next time. So usually I will add to either to my home page or to one of my groups or tabs. If I choose the automatic payments app and click on the little pane and scroll down, you can see that I've already added this to my AP payments group, where I've gathered together, all the apps that relate to the payment program. I can add and remove an app to from one or more groups here. And I can also create a new group by clicking on new groups at the top. In which case it will either appear right off to my other custom groups or depending on the release, it would appear at the bottom of all the other groups. And if I want it to move here, I'll have to go into edit home page to go back to the home page. I click on the SAP logo. Yeah. It's can be rearranged how I want, I can rearrange the tiles by dragging them. So that, for example, all my favorites are at the top. Or I can group similar things together. I'm now going to do a quick demo of some functionality that appears in a lot of the apps. Although I will go into more detail when we get to the individual apps to go into a transaction, I simply click on the tile or we use the app called displace client list. As an example, as we will see this app a lot eight. First of all, I would check the app ID by going to settings and selecting about, I can see that the app ID is if one eight, six one we'll go. The new apps mostly have this five or six digit ID beginning with F note that not all apps have such an ID apps that run a gooey transaction. For example, have the gooey transaction code instead. Not all apps have the same naming convention. For example, web apps are more complicated. This slide shows the link to the fury apps, library pitcher. We're seeing more detail in a second. If I now go to the fury app library. I usually select all apps or all apps first fan, then I can either search by name or at pointy, which is usually better as it's shorter and shows that you have exactly the correct tab as sometimes the name changes or several apps have similar names. As you can see, this app has the same ID that we just saw in the future. You don't want your pad. In other words, F1 eight, six, one. First thing to check is that it's relevant to your system. At the top. You can see whether it's S for HANA or S for HANA cloud. And if you click on the implementation information tab, you can check the exact release, also useful for your support department on the implementation information tab, you can see all the implementation and configuration information. As well as the business roles in catalogs that it appears in Denny related apps, depending on the app, you may find further information in the product features tab, such as links to act documentation or on occasion. She took aerials, although they're mostly fresco and the cloud versions of apps. During the course, whenever I mentioned a fury app ID, I would try to either give the app that ID or the transaction code so that you can check whether you're using the same app or to help you find further information about the happy in the library. Whilst we're in the library, you can also select the list view to see the apps in list format, which may be easier for you pending what you're searching for. You can use the filters at the top. For example, if I go into the role option at the top and select the accounts payable accountant role, I can see which transactions are assigned to that right. There is also a settings button on the right to add additional colors or remove existing ones back to the app itself. Many apps have a similar sort of layout. The filter bar at the top contains the selection criteria. The little icon at the right of the field is the dropdown. For example, if I click on the country dropdown, I can choose countries. I can also use the defined conditions tab for more advanced searching. Different selection criteria. I can click on the adapt filters button and clicking on the more filters button gives me more options. To choose. I just like the box, for example, creative by now appears on the menu. I can save this selection. Criteria is a variance. I can hide a display, the filter bar by using the up and down arrows. And I can also pin it at the top in some places so that it stays even when you scroll the little share button at the top, right. Allows you to send as email or saved as a time. If I click on the question, Mark or help icon, I can get further information on the Mark Fields and clicking on the circle gives more detail where available. This is a new feature in the on-premise system, and you may not see it. If you have an early release, most apps start with an overview screen in the format of a table. Some allow me to then create, maintain data or drill down into more detail. Well, if I can usually sort and filter a column by clicking on the header, the settings button is more flexible and allows me to add fields as well. Too hard to field. I select the box to the left and use the arrows at the top to position it in the order that I want. I can go to the sort tab and sorta multiple fields at once. And in the filter tab, I can use various conditions to filter by on fields, including or excluding fields. The group tab allows us to group by field in some other apps that we'll see later, I can form a kind of hierarchy or tree by grouping several fields at once here. I'm a group by country. If I have a preferred layout, I can save it as a variant and choose whether it's public or just for me. As well as whether it should be my default payout to the right of the settings button is the export to Excel button. This exists in many apps, although not always in the same position. If I want to see more detail about a supplier, I can click on the dark blue supply number. Popup appears with an option to jump directly to that supplier in another app. For example, supply balances, if they are part, one does not appear in the list. I can go to more links and select the hat there so that it appears next time in the popup box, clicking on the blue supplier number instead of an app. Takes me to the supplier fact sheet, but shows, transactions and master data for that supplier. And I will go into more detail on the fact sheet in the section and supply master data to get back to the display supplier app. I just click on the back arrow. In this demo, I will show you some more useful functionality or tips for working with fury. I'm going back into settings where I can change things like the appearance or color we have already seen live. Can you show one or groups on your home page? If you have a lot of groups, your home page would be so easy to load. If you choose all content. Most useful functionality that I use here is the default values. He's mainly by the filter guys in some of the apps. Of course, this works best if you work with the same items each time, for example, one or two company codes or one cost center, but there are quite a lot of values that may be useful if you scroll down. Note that, although it will only allow you to physically type in or select one value in the field and drop down, you can click on additional values to choose a range or list several values using the condition equal to, and the plus button to add more note that although many apps use the D force, they don't make sense in all cases. This particular case I'm taking out. The second company code is it is in a different currency and I've been getting errors where, for example, a report can't work with two companies in different currency. There were a couple of other ways to search with something. If I go to the home page, I can click on home and then home page apps, um, cases can jump to groups or apps quickly here. Over a good way to find something, regardless of whether it's an app master data or transactional data is to use the enhanced search button, which has a certain intelligence, almost like Google. And they can look for similar terms. It fixed some client to supplier, but with just one P. You'll see, it finds the word supplier everywhere, even though it's misspelled, I can search absolutely everywhere or I can restrict the search. If I just enter, for example, one, two, three, it will show everywhere, but one, two, three appears. Cause you can see that includes document numbers, references texts in a purchase requisition. The number of a surface entry sheet and so on, or if I can restrict the dropdown at the enhanced search to just apps, I can further filter the items in the tab, for example, to find any journal entries with one, two, three, and there are other instances in the dropdown. If I select banks, you can see it only shows the one bank, but also updates the top drill downs banks. I can click on the arrow on the right to open up the detail of the bank. If I changed the top dropdown to for example, journal entries, then I'll only see journal entries. I can click on the show filter button and the number of occurrences of the search for one, two, three. The summarize by area. So, for example, there are six German trees that contain one, two, three, in some way. If I scroll further down, I can restrict the search further to fix on for the specific company code or document type. I can export the results to Excel, or if I click on sort, you can see more options. Finally, I can display the results in a table, switch off the filter. And even use the settings button to change the table color. If you're surprised that I'm doing this tutorial using fewer apps rather than the traditional goofy transactions. I just thought I'd do a quick illustration comparing the classic GUI transaction for the automatic payment program with a fury app for the same thing. If you're already familiar with the QB transaction F one, one zero. You'll notice that the fury app follows essentially the same process. In other words, you create a proposal review and if necessary, edited, posted that produce the payment media. Indeed. If you create a payment run using the fury app, you'll also be able to see it in the Google translate. Yeah. However, the app has a number of key advantages. Which I'll highlight in the sneak preview of the payment program app in fury, more details will follow in section six on payments. So identify a payment run in the gooey. You combine the run date together with the five digit ID, but it's difficult to search on anything else. This is okay. If you maybe only have one company code or a very robust naming convention. But often people don't unlike in the app, you cannot search by company code payment, media, or creator, which can be useful in test systems or troubleshooting, and even searching by status. If you're trying to find open payment proposals can sometimes be difficult. In this side, do you see the equivalent functionality in the fury app? Manage automatic payments FC zero seven seven zero. You have an eight filtered bar at the top. So you can, for example, select a date range and only payments created by a specific user or for certain company codes. You can already see without going into the payment program, which payment method rums for as well as the run date posting date and the payment status. Yeah. ID still exists, but it's less critical now that you have other criteria to search. There are even separate tabs to group the different statuses together. You can also see which payment runs have payment media created. It's very simple to drill down into the details of the payment run by clicking on the small blue arrow on the right, the additional log button in the app is much simpler than the entire tab in the classic GUI transaction. And not everybody knows that in the GUI transaction, if you fill in the vendor numbers here, you get a lot more information in the logs, but then if you leave those fields blank, In this slide, you see the parameters for the payment round, which are all in one place compared to the gooey where they're spread over several different tabs. And here you have one simple button for the additional log. I think that on almost every new SAP project. I've been asked how to block multiple invoices for payment in one go, and I have to explain, you can only block them all or one at a time in the payment proposal, plus you lose them all and have to redo it. If you remember the proposal, Oh, you have to use mass change a block them in the line items before running the proposal and remember to manually unblock them afterwards. In the fury app. It's very simple to select as many or as few as you want block and unblock them with a single click. Yeah. You can easily block a number of items at the same time by just selecting the box to the left of each item. You can also use the settings button, fed films, filtering to select a number of items quickly. For example, by days, document types, discounts, et cetera, you can also unblock certain types of blocks directly in the payment program. Troubleshooting is quicker. For example, you can click on either the blue vendor number. Well, the blue document number to drill down into the supplier or the document for further information, the lock is easy to read and you can drill down on some of the messages for further information and you can export the whole lot techs. And if you prefer, that's just the differences in one app where the functionality is in fact, very similar in fury. There are many other apps with better functionality and also many new apps with functionality that doesn't even exist in the classic Dewey, even in S four HANA. So I hope you enjoy exploring everything to do with accounts payable and fury in the rest of the tutorial.