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How Candidates are selected for Interview Selection is the process of screening applicants to ensure that the most appropriate candidate is hired. The first step in the selection process is to review the information (CV, application form) provided by all job applicants to determine which applicants meet the minimum criteria set out in the job specification. Job applicants who meet or exceed the minimum criteria are then assessed to decide which ones will be short-listed for a job interview. The most common methods of selection for all positions include an interview followed by a reference check. Other selection techniques used during the interview phase are: work samples, written tests, in-ray exercises, customer-services role-plays, presentations, and personality or aptitude tests. After making a conditional offer, additional selection techniques can include: criminal records check, driver's records check. Written consent is required before requesting records checks.Understanding the Interview Process Interviews are designed to draw out skills, experience and competences. Questions will be job-related and will test the fulfilment of job requirements. In most cases, competency-based interviews are used. In the case of the ‘Personal Shopper’, you would be asked questions relating to the role profile. Expect customer service, teamwork and initiative to be asked, as well as probing your experience to date. This will ensure that the interviewer is clear of the level of organisational and job fit, you have with the role. If screening interviews are used, it may be that there are lots of suitable candidates. You should still be prepared to share in-depth examples of ‘what’ you have achieved and ‘how’ you have achieved these examples. You may be asked to complete a telephone interview before meeting the recruiter as this allows them to shortlist potential candidates and save time. Questions can be worded to check that candidates can fulfil the job requirements, e.g. qualifications, lifting, etc., as well as checking, very important that a candidate has a legal right to work in the UK. In this case, the onus is on the employer to carry out adequate checks and obtain original proof, or face a fine, or civil penalty of, currently, £20,000, per worker. When candidates are asked to interview, recruiters need to be clear about the process, location, reporting details and what will be involved. Invitations to interview may be sent by email or by letter. Sometimes, you may receive a phone invitation, so try to answer the phone professionally at all times. Only candidates who look like a close match will be invited to interview so you must relate your skills and experiences to what the recruiter is looking for in your CV, application form and interview. Section 3 - Interview Participation and Career Progression. The aim of this module is for the learner to acquire good basic communication skills needed for an interview. The learner will also be guided through a post-interview reflection. Learning outcomes. know how to prepare for an interview. Understand why personal appearance is important in an interview. understanding what competency-based questions are and how to structure answers. be able to present and perform well at an interview. be able to review own performance at an interview. Preparation for the Interview. Some employers use just one interview as the basis for their decision. Some ask candidates back a second time. Interviews are also your opportunity to find out more about the job and the organisation. Employers want you to have enough information to make your decision to accept a job offer with confidence. Careful and thorough preparation is essential and will help you cope with any interview. Prepare well before the interview by working through the following steps: Find out how to get there and allow plenty of time for your journey. It takes time to find your way around a hospital when you don’t know where you’re going. Take time to review the company website and newsletters to consider potential questions about the post or the organisation. Decide what to wear. Make sure it's appropriate and comfortable.

Do check if you are unsure. For example, some companies allow relaxed dress. Do groom yourself, and ensure you look clean and tidy. Personal appearances do count. If you are unkempt and turn up in jeans, when the dress code is formal, you may not be seen as a good organisational fit. If you have any particular needs for the interview, for example, if you are visually impaired, hard of hearing, use a wheelchair, etc, let them know. Interview panels should provide support/access for candidates where required. Read over your CV and application form. Think about your personal skills, motivation and personality. Read the job description and think about how your skills and experience match what the employer is looking for. Identify why you will be able to do the job, with specific reference to the job description and person specification. Think about your successes, big or small, also the lessons you have learnt from where things haven’t gone as well as you had hoped. Prepare to ask the interviewer questions about the job or the organisation. I interview Content – Practice your Examples. Using the STAR Technique to Give Examples. We covered providing these examples in the application form completion section, so let’s take some time to prepare an example to be spoken at the interview. As a guide to the process of collecting behavioural examples, a technique called STAR is utilised. To be a good predictor of future behaviour, an example of past behaviour must contain The S/T - Situation or Task you faced. The Action you took. (What did the person do? What behaviours did they display). The Result of the candidate’s actions. These are the type of questions you may be asked. Situation or Task (S/T). Describe what led up to that. Could you give me a specific situation in which you used that approach? What was the most memorable time when that happened? What caused you to . . . ? Why did you . . . ? When was that? What were the circumstances surrounding . . . ? Who was that customer (co-worker, team member)? What were you reacting to? Action (A) Exactly what did you do? How were your actions different here from . . . ? How did you react? Describe specifically how you did that. What was your part of the project, and how did you handle it? Walk me through the steps you took . . . What did you say to him?
What did you do first . . . ? Result (R) What was the result? What was the outcome? How much did you save? (if asked about the budget) Was it completed on time? (if asked about timeline) What feedback did you receive? What did you learn from the experience? A Few Tips Be polite and shake hands when you meet the interviewer. Remember to take your time to answer questions. The interviewer will not expect you to rush in to answer questions. If you can’t think of a work-based example but have an example from college or university or a social context, ask if you can use that instead. Be honest. If something did not go as well as expected, explain how you used that learning in a further example. The interviewer should build rapport with you. Sit forwards and look interested throughout the interview. The interviewer will notice this.