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The first version of Office contained Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, and Microsoft PowerPoint. Over the years, Office applications have grown substantially over a billion people worldwide. Small businesses have a lot of competition, so it’s important for you to take advantage of all the technology available to help increase productivity and enhance the workplace. Word, Outlook, PowerPoint, OneNote, Access, Excel and Publisher are the most popular of the packages that can help to streamline administrative tasks.
By the end of this section, the learner will:
Develop a basic understanding Microsoft Word and the reasons/benefits of using it
Develop a basic understanding Microsoft PowerPoint and the reasons/benefits of using it
Develop a basic understanding Microsoft Excel and the reasons/benefits of using it
Develop a basic understanding Microsoft Outlook and the reasons/benefits of using it
Nowadays there are versions for mobile use, as well as behind the desk. The desktop version of Office is available for Windows and OS X. A mobile version of Office, Office Mobile, is available for free on Windows Phone, Windows 10 Mobile, iOS and Android. A touch-optimized version of Microsoft Office 2013 is available pre-installed on Windows RT tablets. Let’s take a look at some of the more prominent applications, starting with Word.
Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word is a widely used commercial word processor designed by Microsoft. Microsoft Word is a component of the Microsoft Office suite of productivity software, but can also be purchased as a stand-alone product. It was initially launched in 1983 and has since been revised numerous times. Microsoft Word is available on both Windows and Macintosh operating systems.

Microsoft Word is often called simply Word or MS Word. Microsoft Word offers several features to ease document creation and editing, with benefits including:
WYSIWYG (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) display: It ensures that everything you see on screen will appear the same way when printed or moved to another format or program.
Spell check: Word comes with an built-in dictionary for spell checking; misspelled words are marked with a red squiggly underline. Sometimes, Word auto-corrects an obviously misspelled word or phrase.
Text-level features: Bold, underline, italic and strike-through to showcase particular words or sentences
Page-level features: Indentation, paragraphing and justification to ensure documents look tidy and professional
External support: Word is compatible with many other programs, the most common being the other members of the Office suite.
For the purpose of this Module, we’ll be looking at newer versions of Word 2010, although most features in Word 2010, feature in the 2007 and the 2013 versions. (Note that the 2013 version, can be completely integrated with SkyDrive, which means you’re able to access and perform actions on your files, regardless of where you’re located, as long as you have an Internet connection.)
Basic Tasks in Word

Create a new document

1. Click the File tab and then click New.
2. Under Available Templates, click Blank Document.
3. Click Create.

Find and Apply a Template
Word allows you to apply built-in templates, to apply your own custom templates, and to search from a variety of templates available on Office.com. Office.com provides a wide selection of popular Word templates, including basic CVs, job-specific CVs, agendas, print business cards, and faxes.

To find and apply a template in Word, do the following:
1. On the File tab, click New.
2. Under Available Templates, do one of the following:
3. To use one of the built-in templates, click Sample Templates, click the template that you want, and then click Create.

To reuse a template that you’ve recently used, click Recent Templates, click the template that you want, and then click Create.
To use your own template that you previously created, click My Templates, click the template that you want, and then click OK. You can also download templates rom Office.com

Typing in a Document

In the document, look for the cursor, which tells you where the content you type will appear on the page. Word waits for you to start typing.

If you’d like to start typing further down the page instead of at the very top, press the ENTER key on your keyboard until the cursor is where you want to type.

When you start typing, any text you type pushes the cursor to the right. If you get to the end of a line, just continue to type. The text and insertion point will move on to the next line for you. Once you’ve finished typing your first paragraph, press the ENTER key to go to the next paragraph.

Open a Document
1. Click the File tab, and then click Open.
2. In the left pane of the Open dialog box, click the drive or folder that contains the document.
3. In the right pane of the Open dialog box, open the folder that contains the drawing that you want.
4. Click the document and then click Open.

Save a Document
To save a document in the format used by earlier versions, such as Word 2010 and Word 2007, do the following:
1. Click the File tab.
2. Click Save As.
3. In the File name box, enter a name for your document.
4. Click Save.

To save a document so that it is compatible with Word 2003 or earlier, do the following:
1. Open the document that you want to be used in Word 2003 or earlier.
2. Click the File tab.
3. Click Save As.
4. In the Save as type list, click Word 97-2003 Document. This changes the file format to .doc.
5. In the File name box, type a name for the document.
6. Click Save.

Read Documents
1. Open the document that you want to read.
2. On the View tab, in the Document Views group, click Full Screen Reading
3. To move from page to page in a document, do one of the following:

Click the arrows in the lower corners of the pages.
Press PAGE DOWN and PAGE UP or SPACEBAR and BACKSPACE on the keyboard.
Click the navigation arrows at the top centre of the screen.
Click View Options, and then click Show Two Pages to view two pages, or screens, at a time.

Print your Document
1. Click the File tab and then click Print.
2. Do the following:
Under Print, in the Copies box, enter the number of copies that you want to print.
Under Printer, make sure that the printer that you want is selected.

3. Under Settings, the default print settings for your printer are selected for you. If you want to change a setting, click the setting you want to change and then select the setting that you want. When you are satisfied with the settings, click Print.

Print Preview
Print preview automatically displays when you click on the Print tab in the Backstage view.
Whenever you make a change to a print-related setting, the preview is automatically updated.
1. Click the File tab, and then click Print.
2. A preview of your document automatically appears. To view each page, click the arrows below the preview.

Print part of a document
You can print all or part of your document. Options for choosing what part of a document is printed can be found on the Print tab in the Microsoft Office Backstage view. Under Settings click Print All Pages to view these options.
1. Choosing Print All Pages will print the entire document.
2. Choosing Print Selection will only print the selected content.
3. Choosing Print Current Page will only print the current page.
4. Choose Print Custom Range to print a range of pages.








Saving in a Different Format

When you first save the document, if you click on Save as type and you will see a host of different file types you can save this as. We’ll look at the most common below:

Word Document (.docx)
This is the standard document format that Microsoft first introduced in Word 2007.

Word 97–2003 Document (.doc)
Pre-2007 versions of Word can’t read the .docx or .docm format without a special compatibility pack installed. If you plan to share your document with someone who has an older version of Word, save the file in this format, or get your colleagues to install the compatibility pack.

Word Template (.dotx, .dotm, or .dot)
If you want to save a document as a template to use as a model for creating future documents, select one of these formats. The .dotx format works with Word 2007 and 2010, as does the .dotm format, which lets you use macros in the document. If you’re saving the template to work with Word 97–2003, use the .dot format.

PDF (.pdf)
Portable document format (PDF for short) is a standard file format that accurately preserves your formatting, making it easier to exchange documents electronically. Many of the publications and forms you can download from the internet are in this format.

Web Page (.htm)
If you want to display a document on the Internet as a web page, this is the file type to choose. It formats the document to make it look good on the internet.

Rich Text Format (.rtf)
This format, designed to be compatible with many different word processing programs, holds the text and some formatting information.

OpenDocument Text (.odt)
This file type uses the OpenDocument standard to create a file that you can open and edit in Word, OpenOffice.org’s Writer and many other word processing programs, including StarOffice, NeoOfficeWriter, and LotusNotes 8 or later, as well as online word processors such as Google Docs.

Works 6.0–9.0 (.wps)
Microsoft Works is a smaller, stripped-down version of Office that Microsoft stopped selling in 2009, replacing it with Office Starter 2010. Still, many people used Works as a cheaper alternative to Office, so if you need to share a document with someone who uses Works, save it in this format.

Please note that if you are planning to create fancy documents and newsletters, Microsoft Publisher may be a better option than Word. Microsoft Publisher is an entry-level desktop publishing application from Microsoft, differing from Microsoft Word in that the emphasis is placed on page layout and design rather than text composition and proofing. It is not as sophisticated as Adobe InDesign, which is another design package, but has some templates which are useful for marketing within a small business environment.
Now we’ll move onto the key features of PowerPoint.