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Politics and Romantic Poetry - Lesson Summary

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In Romantic poetry, there is a politics of gender where there is a feminization of Nature and the naturalization of the feminine.
Romanticism had strong ties with imperialism and colonial conquest, and therefore a keen interest in race.
Romantic thought and poetry, from Blake to Shelley, was also interested and participated in debates about class, monarchy, rights and governance.
Poets were concerned about the despotism of England’s monarchs, the collapse of welfare and social justice, exploitation and unending tyranny.
Political poetry also took the form of Abolitionist poetry, which is poetry about abolishing the slave trade and slavery.
Wordsworth was concerned about racial discrimination, but he used it to talk about England as a place of refuge.
In his “Ode to Liberty”, Shelley argues that a fulfilling human life is impossible without liberty.
John Clare's poetry is about several things such as environmentalism, the politics of community, enclosures and the social hierarchies that determined the use of the land.