Avaliação pelo vírus da doença do vírus Ebola-Avaliação
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Avaliação pelo vírus da doença do vírus Ebola-Avaliação

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  • Nota de Estudos
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    Mohammad Nasir U.
    BD
    Mohammad Nasir U.

    Hello everyone!

    Kokou O.
    TG
    Kokou O.

    very good

    Lemeraude D.
    GA
    Lemeraude D.

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) is a rare disease that causes severe symptoms and can be life-threatening. It has also been called as ‘Ebola haemorrhagic fever’ (VHF). Researchers named the disease after the Ebola River that flows in the Congo. Outbreaks of EVD first occurred in 1976 in the Sudan and Democratic Republic of Congo. Although the Ebola virus has been present for more than 35 years, an outbreak occurred in March 2014 that began in West Africa. This outbreak has proven more deadly, severe, and widespread than previous outbreaks. In Africa, fruit bats are believed to be the natural hosts of Ebola virus. The virus is transmitted from wildlife to people through contact with infected fruit bats, or through intermediate hosts, such as monkeys, apes, or pigs that have themselves become infected through contact with bat saliva or faeces. People may then become infected through contact with infected animals, either in the process of slaughtering or through consumption of blood, milk, or raw or undercooked meat. The virus is then passed from person to person through direct contact with the blood, secretions or other bodily fluids of infected persons, or from contact with contaminated needles or other equipment in the environment. EVD, which has a case fatality rate of up to 90%, is a severe acute viral illness often characterized by the sudden onset of fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headache, nausea and sore throat. This is followed by vomiting, diarrhoea, impaired kidney and liver function, and in some cases, both internal and external bleeding. Laboratory findings frequently include low white blood cell and platelet counts and elevated liver enzymes. The incubation period, the time interval from infection with the virus to onset of symptoms, is 2 to 21 days. People remain infectious as long as their blood and secretions contain the virus, a period that has been reported to be as long as 61 days after onset of illness. Even if when men are cured, they must wait up to 7 weeks before starting sexual intercourses because the virus remains in their semen. Definitive diagnosis of EVD is made through laboratory testing. Because samples from patients are a source of infection risk for others, testing is conducted under maximum biological containment conditions. No vaccine is available, nor is there any specific treatment. Severely ill patients require intensive supportive care. Patients are frequently dehydrated and require oral rehydration with solutions containing electrolytes, or intravenous fluids. Raising awareness of the risk factors for infection and the protective measures that should be taken is the only way to reduce human infection and subsequent deaths. Close unprotected physical contact with Ebola patients should be avoided. Appropriate use of gloves and personal protective equipment (including hand hygiene before putting on, and especially after taking off personal protective equipment) should be practised when taking care of ill patients at home. Regular hand washing is required after visiting patients in hospital, as well as after taking care of patients at home. Almost all transmission of the virus to health-care workers has been reported when basic infection control measures have not been observed. Health-care workers caring for any patient should practice standard precautions. When caring for patients with suspected or confirmed Ebola virus infection, health-care workers should apply, in addition to standard precautions, other infection control measures to avoid any exposure to patients’ blood and body fluids and with possibly contaminated environments. Preparation for burial of the bodies of persons who have died from Ebola virus disease also carries high risks of transmission of the virus. Those who have died from the disease should be promptly and safely buried.

    Lemeraude D.
    GA
    Lemeraude D.

    It is said that even by breathing the same air as someone who is infected from Ebola you can get Ebola. Does it mean that Ebola can be considered as part of respiratory diseases or not?

    Musafiri K.
    GN
    Musafiri K.

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) is a rare disease that causes severe symptoms and can be life-threatening. It has also been called as ‘Ebola haemorrhagic fever’ (VHF). Researchers named the disease after the Ebola River that flows in the Congo. Outbreaks of EVD first occurred in 1976 in the Sudan and Democratic Republic of Congo. Although the Ebola virus has been present for more than 35 years, an outbreak occurred in March 2014 that began in West Africa. This outbreak has proven more deadly, severe, and widespread than previous outbreaks. In Africa, fruit bats are believed to be the natural hosts of Ebola virus. The virus is transmitted from wildlife to people through contact with infected fruit bats, or through intermediate hosts, such as monkeys, apes, or pigs that have themselves become infected through contact with bat saliva or faeces. People may then become infected through contact with infected animals, either in the process of slaughtering or through consumption of blood, milk, or raw or undercooked meat. The virus is then passed from person to person through direct contact with the blood, secretions or other bodily fluids of infected persons, or from contact with contaminated needles or other equipment in the environment. EVD, which has a case fatality rate of up to 90%, is a severe acute viral illness often characterized by the sudden onset of fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headache, nausea and sore throat. This is followed by vomiting, diarrhoea, impaired kidney and liver function, and in some cases, both internal and external bleeding. Laboratory findings frequently include low white blood cell and platelet counts and elevated liver enzymes. The incubation period, the time interval from infection with the virus to onset of symptoms, is 2 to 21 days. People remain infectious as long as their blood and secretions contain the virus, a period that has been reported to be as long as 61 days after onset of illness. Even if when men are cured, they must wait up to 7 weeks before starting sexual intercourses because the virus remains in their semen. Definitive diagnosis of EVD is made through laboratory testing. Because samples from patients are a source of infection risk for others, testing is conducted under maximum biological containment conditions. No vaccine is available, nor is there any specific treatment. Severely ill patients require intensive supportive care. Patients are frequently dehydrated and require oral rehydration with solutions containing electrolytes, or intravenous fluids. Raising awareness of the risk factors for infection and the protective measures that should be taken is the only way to reduce human infection and subsequent deaths. Close unprotected physical contact with Ebola patients should be avoided. Appropriate use of gloves and personal protective equipment (including hand hygiene before putting on, and especially after taking off personal protective equipment) should be practised when taking care of ill patients at home. Regular hand washing is required after visiting patients in hospital, as well as after taking care of patients at home. Almost all transmission of the virus to health-care workers has been reported when basic infection control measures have not been observed. Health-care workers caring for any patient should practice standard precautions. When caring for patients with suspected or confirmed Ebola virus infection, health-care workers should apply, in addition to standard precautions, other infection control measures to avoid any exposure to patients’ blood and body fluids and with possibly contaminated environments. Preparation for burial of the bodies of persons who have died from Ebola virus disease also carries high risks of transmission of the virus. Those who have died from the disease should be promptly and safely buried.

    Cedric W.
    CD
    Cedric W.

    je n'arrive pas à accéder au-dit cours ni aux questions... je fais comment? par ce que je désire suivre ce cour. Merci

    Chaouch M.
    TN
    Chaouch M.

    Evaluation portant sur la compréhension du virus Ebola

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