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Module 1: Módulo 6: Fatores que Influenciam Transculturais Cuidados de Enfermagem

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Socio-Cultural Beliefs about Illness

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There are many variables to consider in giving nursing care to a person of a race, religion, or culture different from your own. Respect for the patient, however, is something all aspects of transcultural nursing have in common.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing this lesson you will be able to:

Cite examples of differences in beliefs about the cause of illness

Cite examples of differences in treatment of disorders


a) Examples of Differences in Beliefs About the Causes of Illness.
(1) Japanese Shintoist.
(1) Man is inherently good.
(2) Illness is caused when the person comes into contact with pollutants, such as blood or a corpse.
(2) Native Americans.
(a) Native Americans follow these three concepts:
1) Prevention.
2) Treatment.
3) Health maintenance.
(b) The person's health is defined in terms of the person's relationship with nature and the universe.
b. Examples of Differences in Treatment of Disorders.
(1) Blacks and Raza/Latino cultures have long used roots, potions, and herbs for treating illnesses.
(2) Filipinos and Raza/Latino groups believe that:
(b) Hotness and coldness, wetness and dryness, must be balanced to be healthy.
(c) Certain illnesses are hot or cold, wet or dry.
(d) Certain foods and medications, classified as hot or cold, are added or subtracted to bring about a balance of humors or to fight off "hot" or "cold" illnesses.
(3) Copper bracelets are worn by some groups as a preventive or cure for arthritis.
c. Other Cultural Influences to Consider When Planning Nursing Care.
(1) The nurse should take into consideration the needs of people who practice folk healing. The folk healer (curandero in Spanish) should be allowed to see the patient.
(2) South Americans often wear chains to drive away evil spirits. The nurse should not remove these unless it is absolutely necessary.