Loading

Module 1: Módulo 4: Cuidar em um ambiente hospitalar - Estudo de caso no Reino Unido

Nota de Estudos
Study Reminders
Support
Text Version

An Introduction to the Hospital

Set your study reminders

We will email you at these times to remind you to study.
  • Monday

    -

    7am

    +

    Tuesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Wednesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Thursday

    -

    7am

    +

    Friday

    -

    7am

    +

    Saturday

    -

    7am

    +

    Sunday

    -

    7am

    +

This module considers the type of care offered in hospitals, using Leeds General Hospital as a case study.

The module looks at:

The people who have roles within the hospital.

How they interact with each other.

Patients and what they consider to be 'care'.

The different approaches and contributions to care by doctors and nurses are explored and patients give their perspective on the care they receive.


After studying this unit you should be able to:

Identify the different approaches and contributions staff make to care for health in a hospital setting.

Evaluate the interpersonal relationships of those working together for health in a hospital setting.

Appreciate how patients might experience care for health in a hospital setting.


Under the NHS and Community Care Act 1990, health care providers in the hospital and community sectors could for the first time bid to become self-governing trusts. Trusts are in principle free to develop their own management arrangements, to use their assets as they see fit, and to set terms and conditions for their staff.

A first wave of 57 units was granted trust status in April 1991, and successive waves of successful applications in subsequent years meant that over 95 per cent of providers were trusts by 1996.

Leeds General Infirmary

To explore care in the setting of an acute hospital, we will analyze a case study based on a visit to Leeds General Infirmary (LGI) in the winter of 1996. The hospital provides a service of medical and surgical care for local people and, because it is a specialist teaching hospital with a medical school attached, patients are referred from all over the region for specialist advice, treatment and care.

Trusts bid for contracts with GP fund-holders and with health authorities to provide services for an area. They compete with directly managed units, with private and voluntary providers and with each other.

They are still part of the NHS, accountable to the Secretary of State through outposts of the NHS Management Executive.