Diploma in Business Process Management - | pt-BR - 623 - 44703
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  • Nota de Estudos
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    OLUCHI O.
    NG
    OLUCHI O.

    Knowledge should be shared freely to enhance a good business management system.

    Hasan R.
    PK
    Hasan R.

    Knowledge is often seen as a rich form of information. This differentiation however is not terribly helpful. A more useful definition of knowledge is that it is about know-how and know-why. A metaphor is that of a cake. An analysis of its molecular constituents is data – for most purposes not very useful – you may not even be able to tell it were a cake. A list of ingredients is information – more useful – an experienced cook could probably make the cake – the data has been given context. The recipe though would be knowledge – written knowledge - explicit knowledge – it tells you how-to make the cake. An inexperienced cook however, even with the recipe might not make a good cake. A person, though, with relevant knowledge, experience, and skill – knowledge in their heads - not easily written down - tacit knowledge – would almost certainly make an excellent cake from the recipe. It is important to note that to make knowledge productive you need information. Knowing how to make a cake is not sufficient – you need the list of ingredients. And to decide what cake to make - you need information – the tastes of the consumers of the cake. Know-why is also important. If an ingredient of the cake was unavailable – knowing the purpose of that ingredient might help a knowledgeable cook substitute an alternative. In fact know-why is often more important than know-how as it allows you to be creative - to fall back on principles – to re-invent your know-how. Knowledge Management There are many definitions of Knowledge Management. A common definition is ‘The collection of processes that govern the creation, dissemination, and leveraging of knowledge to fulfil organisational objectives.’ I feel this definition is inadequate, however, as it limits knowledge management to a set of processes. I prefer what I feel is a more useful definition: - “Knowledge Management is a business philosophy. It is an emerging set of principles, processes, organisational structures, and technology applications that help people share and leverage their knowledge to meet their business objectives.” This puts focus and responsibility on the individual – the knowledge worker - and on the holistic nature of knowledge management. Also critically it is about meeting business objectives. Knowledge Management is not an end in its self. It is also fundamentally about sharing knowledge and putting that knowledge to use.

    Hasan R.
    PK
    Hasan R.

    Knowledge management is the process of capturing, storing, retrieving and distributing the knowledge of the individuals in an organization for use by others in the organization to improve the quality and/or efficiency of decision making across the firm. The primary enabler of knowledge management efforts is the power of contemporary information technologies. Effective knowledge management means that an organization must be able to connect the knowledge of one individual with other individuals in the firm who need the same knowledge. Distribution dictates the use of electronic communications technology – namely groupware systems. Advanced database management systems and AI systems technologies for orderly storage and retrieval of the captured knowledge are also critical. All of the capabilities of groupware, as discussed earlier in this chapter, are pivotal to supporting knowledge management for organizations of virtually any size. Even the simplest components such as e-mail and document sharing are vital components. Add to these the capability of Electronic Document Management systems and the information content of the electronically distributed messages vastly increases. Indeed, many people consider the roots of knowledge management to be in the development of Lotus Notes, a widely used groupware system specifically designed to facilitate sharing of documents, e-mail, and group communication. In many organizations, when an individual is faced with a problem and is unsure of the solution, he or she will post the problem to an electronic blackboard maintained by the groupware system. Other individuals in the organization who have the knowledge to resolve the issue will note the query on the blackboard and e-mail their suggested solution approach to the original individual posting the issue – hence, sharing their knowledge. The document component becomes a means of making the process even more efficient by having individuals within the organization transfer documents detailing their resolution to a given problem to a central repository

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