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Module 1: Módulo 14: Introdução ao sistema nervoso humano

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Page 1 Cerebral hemispheres.
The cerebrum consists of two cerebral hemispheres, right and left.

They are joined together by a very large fiber tract knownas the corpus callosum (the great commissure).

Page 2 Lobes
Each hemisphere can be divided into four lobes.

Each lobe is named after the cranial bone it lies beneath--parietal, frontal, occipital, and temporal.

(Actually, there are five lobes. The fifth is hidden at the bottom of the lateral fissure. It
is known as the insula or insular lobe. It is devoted mainly to visceral activities.)

Page 3 Gyri and Sulci
The cerebral cortex, the thin layer at the surface of each hemisphere, is folded.

This helps to increase the amount of area available to neurons.

Each fold is called a gyrus. Each groove between two gyri is called a sulcus.

Page 4 Gyri and Sulci
The lateral sulcus is a cleft separating the frontal and parietal lobes from the temporal and occipital lobes.

Therefore, the lateral sulcus runs along the lateral surface of each hemisphere.

The central sulcus is a cleft separating the frontal from the parietal lobe.

Roughly, each central sulcus runs from the left or right side of the cerebrum to top center and over into the medial side of the cerebrum.

Page 5 Gyri and Sulci
There are two gyri that run parallel to the central sulcus.

Anterior to the central sulcus is the precentral gyrus.

Posterior to the central sulcus is the postcentral gyrus.