Introdução à Educação Especial-Resumo
Loading
Anterior Previous slide Next slide Próximo
New course

Este curso foi revisado!

Para uma experiência de aprendizado mais agradável, recomendamos que você estude a versão republicada amigável deste curso.

Leve-me ao curso revisado.

- or -

Continue studying this course

Introdução à Educação Especial-Resumo

  • Study Reminders

    Set your study reminders

    We'll email you at these times to remind you to study

    You can set up to 7 reminders per week

    You're all set

    We'll email you at these times to remind you to study

    Monday

    -

    7am

    +

    Tuesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Wednesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Thursday

    -

    7am

    +

    Friday

    -

    7am

    +

    Saturday

    -

    7am

    +

    Sunday

    -

    7am

    +
  • Nota de Estudos
  • Rever Tópicos
    Maria B.
    PA
    Maria B.

    I liked the information provided on this topic.

    Mike L.
    GB
    Mike L.

    A flexible approach to the tuition needs of students with disabilities seems to be imperative but not to the point of favouratism at the expense of the rest of the class.

    Rene V.
    ZA
    Rene V.

    HI I have no information n this summary, it just keeps on throwing out a blank page, if you could maybe see what;s wrong? Thanks in advance!

    Candy K.
    UG
    Candy K.

    This module provides very good information. i have enjoyed it

    Nicola W.
    UG
    Nicola W.

    As a Learning Support Co-ordinator that would in an International school, I find it very interesting the different expectations between an American and International school. I have freedom to create IEPs and support students however I feel will cater to an individuals needs.

    Raquel G.
    BR
    Raquel G.

    This module shows a general idea of special education! Very good!

    Cindy G.
    US
    Cindy G.

    I was in Nursing school in 78 when my brother (police officer) was injured in the line of duty ending up as a paraplegic. I am proud to say I fought very hard for accessibility for the disabled/wheelchair bound persons. Today as an academic nurse educator, I find there is an over use of the term disability. I had a student who wanted to be in my program and had just had shoulder surgery, Dr. stated absolutely no lifting. I dropped the student and told her she was eligible to reapply for the following year once her Dr. released her. She went through OCR and grieved the drop and won. She was unable to meet lifting and other expectations of the roll. However what I had done was I accommodated her while waiting for her new Dr. appointment, by allowing her to talk through procedures. If I had dropped her the first day I am not sure if there would have been an issue, however there was financial aide involved. There are many policies that continue to require updating to "protect" not only the facility, but those we care for and the student. This whole case saddened me so, because I am very much an advocate for the disabled, and if there were a way (and I do plan to find one) to have a paraplegic nursing student in my class I will do it. For the reason that there are many nursing areas that do not require ambulation, however one must be able to make their way through the process to get there. This is where an IEP can come in handy for the college student in particular programs, but also requires a great deal of work with the state board of nursing. Sometimes, sadly, it takes a drastic event to make a change. I have been working with the high school CTE programs to provide for students with special needs, the ability to take the nurse aide program, it is a slow process, but we are developing IEP's for these students. This will be a big deal for our rural, 5th poorest county in the US.

Notification

Você recebeu uma nova notificação

Clique aqui para visualizar todos eles