Percepção aborígene da terra: questões em foco
Loading
Anterior Previous slide Next slide Próximo
New course

Este curso foi revisado!

Para uma experiência de aprendizado mais agradável, recomendamos que você estude a versão republicada amigável deste curso.

Leve-me ao curso revisado.

- or -

Continue studying this course

Percepção aborígene da terra: questões em foco

  • Study Reminders

    Set your study reminders

    We'll email you at these times to remind you to study

    You can set up to 7 reminders per week

    You're all set

    We'll email you at these times to remind you to study

    Monday

    -

    7am

    +

    Tuesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Wednesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Thursday

    -

    7am

    +

    Friday

    -

    7am

    +

    Saturday

    -

    7am

    +

    Sunday

    -

    7am

    +
  • Nota de Estudos
  • Rever Tópicos
    Christian Gordon R.
    ID
    Christian Gordon R.

    Mabo and wik cases in Australia show to us that native title on the land use is important to recognise. However, the increasing use of land is the big issue here. Industry and pastoral's need to land occupation will override the native title. Government have to elaborate the use of land, so it will be mutual for all stakeholder.

    Zachary B.
    US
    Zachary B.

    What are some focus aboriginal questions of the land?

    James E.
    US
    James E.

    where do you answer the questions

    Rk S.
    IN
    Rk S.

    Focus Questions: Aboriginal Perceptions of the Land. 1. Describe how Aboriginal people see the land. 2. How does the spiritual nature of Aboriginal people's perception of the land effect the way they treat it? 3. Explain how Aboriginal people lived on the land. 4. How did the Aboriginal people change the land? 5. What is the relationship between the Australian fauna and the Aboriginal people? 7. Explain how 'Mabo and Wik' have changed the environmental debate in Australia. What does it mean for the future?

    Aline M.
    BR
    Aline M.

    Aboriginal from all around the world knows how to deal with nature, they understand that they belong to/ they ARE the nature.

    Chris D.
    US
    Chris D.

    This is derived from Wikipedia, "...Indigenous Australians are the original inhabitants of the Australian continent and nearby islands.[2] Recent findings indicate that Indigenous Australians are probably descendants of the first modern humans to migrate out of Africa. They migrated from Africa to Asia around 70,000 years ago[3] and arrived in Australia around 50,000 years ago.[4][5] The Torres Strait Islanders are indigenous to the Torres Strait Islands, which are at the northernmost tip of Queensland near Papua New Guinea. The term "Aboriginal" is traditionally applied to only the indigenous inhabitants of mainland Australia and Tasmania, along with some of the adjacent islands, i.e.: the "first peoples". Indigenous Australians is an inclusive term used when referring to both Aboriginal and Torres Strait islanders. The earliest definite human remains found to date are those of Mungo Man, which have been dated at about 40,000 years old (although comparison of the mitochondrial DNA with that of ancient and modern Aborigines indicate Mungo Man is unrelated to Australian Aborigines). However, the time of arrival of the ancestors of Indigenous Australians is a matter of debate among researchers, with estimates dating back as far as 125,000 years ago.[6] There is great diversity among different Indigenous communities and societies in Australia, each with its own unique mixture of cultures, customs and languages. In present-day Australia these groups are further divided into local communities.[7] Although there were over 250–300 spoken languages with 600 dialects at the start of European settlement, fewer than 200 of these remain in use,[8] and all but 20 are considered to be endangered.[9] Aboriginal people today mostly speak English, with Aboriginal phrases and words being added to create Australian Aboriginal English. The population of Indigenous Australians at the time of permanent European settlement has been estimated at between 318,000[10] and 1,000,000[11] with the distribution being similar to that of the current Australian population, with the majority living in the south-east, centred along the Murray River.[12] Since 1995, the Australian Aboriginal Flag and the Torres Strait Islander Flag have been among the official "Flags of Australia". Religious demography among Indigenous Australians is not conclusive because the methodology of the census is not always well-suited to obtaining accurate information on Aboriginal people.[91] In the 2006 census, 73% of the Indigenous population reported an affiliation with a Christian denomination, 24% reported no religious affiliation and 1% reported affiliation with an Australian Aboriginal traditional religion.[92] A small but growing minority of Aborigines are followers of Islam.[93] Aboriginal people traditionally adhered to animist spiritual frameworks. Within Aboriginal belief systems, a formative epoch known as 'the Dreamtime' stretches back into the distant past when the creator ancestors known as the First Peoples travelled across the land, creating and naming as they went.[94] Indigenous Australia's oral tradition and religious values are based upon reverence for the land and a belief in this Dreamtime. The Dreaming is at once both the ancient time of creation and the present-day reality of Dreaming. There were a great many different groups, each with its own individual culture, belief structure, and language. These cultures overlapped to a greater or lesser extent, and evolved over time. Major ancestral spirits include the Rainbow Serpent, Baiame, Dirawong and Bunjil. Traditional healers (known as Ngangkari in the Western desert areas of Central Australia) were highly respected men and women who not only acted as healers or doctors, but were generally also custodians of important Dreamtime stories.[95] Music[edit] Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, a contemporary singer of the Yolngu language. Main article: Indigenous Australian music Music has formed an integral part of the social, cultural and ceremonial observances of people through the millennia of their individual and collective histories to the present day, and has existed for 50,000 years.[96][97][98][99] The various Indigenous Australian communities developed unique musical instruments and folk styles. The didgeridoo, which is widely thought to be a stereotypical instrument of Aboriginal people, was traditionally played by people of only the eastern Kimberley region and Arnhem Land (such as the Yolngu), and then by only the men.[100] Around 1950, the first research into Aboriginal music was undertaken by the anthropologist Adolphus Elkin, who recorded Aboriginal music in Arnhem Land.[101] Hip hop music is helping preserve indigenous languages.[102] At the Sydney 2000 Olympics, Christine Anu sang the song "My Island Home" at the Closing Ceremony.[103] Art[edit] Aboriginal Rock Art, Ubirr Art Site, Kakadu National Park. Main article: Indigenous Australian art Australia has a tradition of Aboriginal art which is thousands of years old, the best known forms being rock art and bark painting. Evidence of Aboriginal art in Australia can be traced back at least 30,000 years.[104] Examples of ancient Aboriginal rock artworks can be found throughout the continent – notably in national parks such as those of the UNESCO listed sites at Uluru and Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory, but also within protected parks in urban areas such as at Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park in Sydney.[105][106][107] The Sydney rock engravings are approximately 5000 to 200 years old. Murujuga in Western Australia has the Friends of Australian Rock Art have advocated its preservation, and the numerous engravings there were heritage listed in 2007.[108][109] Albert Namatjira, at Government House, Sydney, in 1955. In terms of age and abundance, cave art in Australia is comparable to that of Lascaux and Altamira in Europe,[110] and Aboriginal art is believed to be the oldest continuing tradition of art in the world.[111] There are three major regional styles: the geometric style found in Central Australia, Tasmania, the Kimberley and Victoria known for its concentric circles, arcs and dots; the simple figurative style found in Queensland and the complex figurative style found in Arnhem Land and the Kimberley which includes X-Ray art, Gwian Gwian (Bradshaw) and Wunjina. These designs generally carry significance linked to the spirituality of the Dreamtime.[112] Paintings were usually created in earthy colours, from paint made from ochre. Such ochres were also used to paint their bodies for ceremonial purposes. Modern Aboriginal artists continue the tradition, using modern materials in their artworks. Several styles of Aboriginal art have developed in modern times, including the watercolour paintings of the Hermannsburg School, and the acrylic Papunya Tula "dot art" movement. William Barak (c.1824–1903) was one of the last traditionally educated of the Wurundjeri-willam, people who come from the district now incorporating the city of Melbourne. He remains notable for his artworks which recorded traditional Aboriginal ways for the education of Westerners (which remain on permanent exhibition at the Ian Potter Centre of the National Gallery of Victoria and at the Ballarat Fine Art Gallery. Margaret Preston (1875–1963) was among the early non-indigenous painters to incorporate Aboriginal influences in her works. Albert Namatjira (1902–1959) is one of the most famous Australian artists and an Arrernte man. His landscapes inspired the Hermannsburg School of art. The works of Elizabeth Durack are notable for their fusion of Western and indigenous influences. Since the 1970s, indigenous artists have employed the use of acrylic paints – with styles such as that of the Western Desert Art Movement becoming globally renowned 20th-century art movements. The National Gallery of Australia exhibits a great many indigenous art works, including those of the Torres Strait Islands who are known for their traditional sculpture and headgear.[113] Literature[edit] David Unaipon (1872–1967), the first Aboriginal author. By 1788, Indigenous Australians had not developed a system of writing[citation needed], so the first literary accounts of Aborigines come from the journals of early European explorers, which contain descriptions of first contact, both violent and friendly. Early accounts by Dutch explorers and the English buccaneer William Dampier wrote of the "natives of New Holland" as being "barbarous savages", but by the time of Captain James Cook and First Fleet marine Watkin Tench (the era of Jean-Jacques Rousseau), accounts of Aborigines were more sympathetic and romantic: "these people may truly be said to be in the pure state of nature, and may appear to some to be the most wretched upon the earth; but in reality they are far happier than ... we Europeans", wrote Cook in his journal on 23 August 1770. Noel Pearson is an Aboriginal lawyer, rights activist and essayist. Letters written by early Aboriginal leaders like Bennelong and Sir Douglas Nicholls are retained as treasures of Australian literature, as is the historic Yirrkala bark petitions of 1963 which is the first traditional Aboriginal document recognised by the Australian Parliament.[114] David Unaipon (1872–1967) is credited as providing the first accounts of Aboriginal mythology written by an Aboriginal: Legendary Tales of the Aborigines; he is known as the first Aboriginal author. Oodgeroo Noonuccal (1920–1995) was a famous Aboriginal poet, writer and rights activist credited with publishing the first Aboriginal book of verse: We Are Going (1964).[115] Sally Morgan's novel My Place was considered a breakthrough memoir in terms of bringing indigenous stories to wider notice.

    Muhammad S.
    PK
    Muhammad S.

    How the aborigines people lived on the land?

  • Text Version
Notification

Você recebeu uma nova notificação

Clique aqui para visualizar todos eles