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Topic9

  • Nota de Estudos
  • Rever Tópicos
    Md.Nur-E- A.
    BD
    Md.Nur-E- A.

    taking advice of doctor

    Shelia L C.
    US
    Shelia L C.

    i am at the end of my modules, I need some help with completing HIV_AIDs 2---33 topics & questions--I have completed 87 topics to receive a diploma in Health Studies.

    Kagoya J.
    UG
    Kagoya J.

    yes that is good and very important to help children, to teach them the dangers of playing with sharp instruments and try your best to help small children not to get into contact with sharps by discarding all the used one in the pit-latrine and then cover.

    Kagoya J.
    UG
    Kagoya J.

    Types of Anti - HIV drugs used in the treatment of HIV: There's no cure for HIV/AIDS, but a variety of drugs can be used in combination to control the virus. Each class of anti-HIV drugs blocks the virus in different ways. It's best to combine at least three drugs from two classes to avoid creating strains of HIV that are immune to single drugs. The classes of anti-HIV drugs include: •Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). NNRTIs disable a protein needed by HIV to make copies of itself. Examples include efavirenz (Sustiva), etravirine (Intelence) and nevirapine (Virtamine). •Nucleoside or nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). NRTIs are faulty versions of building blocks that HIV needs to make copies of itself. Examples include Abacavir (Zinged), and the combination drugs emtricitabine-tenofovir (Truvada), and lamivudine-zidovudine (Combivir). •Protease inhibitors (PIs). PIs disable protease, another protein that HIV needs to make copies of itself. Examples include atazanavir (Reyataz), darunavir (Prezista), fosamprenavir (Lexiva) and indinavir (Crixivan). •Entry or fusion inhibitors. These drugs block HIV's entry into CD4 cells. Examples include enfuvirtide (Fuzeon) and maraviroc (Selzentry). •Integrase inhibitors. These drugs work by disabling integrase, a protein that HIV uses to insert its genetic material into CD4 cells. Examples include raltegravir (Isentress), elvitegravir (Vitekta) and dolutegravir (Tivicay).

    Noel W.
    MW
    Noel W.

    be open when meeting the doctor

    Hafsah D.
    NG
    Hafsah D.

    What can we do for nausea and vomiting

    Lawrence T.
    GH
    Lawrence T.

    Talking to others Talking about what you're going through can help, but think carefully about who you tell about your diagnosis. "Try and stay in control of who you disclose your health status to," suggests Reynolds. "Don’t rush into telling anyone. Work out why you want to tell them and think of the potential consequences, for example if they tell someone else. If you decide to tell them, work out how you will answer any questions they might ask, such as 'How did you get it?'" Find out more about telling people you're HIV positive in the living with HIV section. If your family or partner would like support to help them cope with your diagnosis, they can also contact HIV organisations. As well as talking to a doctor, nurse, friends or family about how you're feeling, you might also want to meet other people with HIV. Finding out how other people have coped with a positive diagnosis, and hearing about their experiences of living with HIV, can be helpful for some people. There are support groups for people who have recently found out they're HIV positive. Your GP, HIV clinic or a helpline can let you know what's available in your area. There are also support groups for specific people, such as young people, women, gay people, people from Africa and people who are HIV negative and have a partner who is HIV positive. The website healthtalkonline has videos and articles about people's experiences of living with HIV, including getting an HIV diagnosis.

    Bitrus S.
    NG
    Bitrus S.

    biomedical method is also effective.

    Zeeshan J.
    AU
    Zeeshan J.

    Finding out how other people have coped with a positive diagnosis, and hearing about their experiences of living with HIV, can be helpful for some people. There are support groups for people who have recently found out they're HIV positive. Your GP, HIV clinic or a helpline can let you know what's available in your area. There are also support groups for specific people, such as young people, women, gay people, people from Africa and people who are HIV negative and have a partner who is HIV positive. The website healthtalkonline has videos and articles about people's experiences of living with HIV, including getting an HIV diagnosis.

    Zachary B.
    US
    Zachary B.

    What is this topic?is thi

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