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Saúde global

  • Nota de Estudos
  • Rever Tópicos
    Md.Nur-E- A.
    BD
    Md.Nur-E- A.

    primary health are not confined to developing countries.

    Kagoya J.
    UG
    Kagoya J.

    Global health is the health of populations in the global context; it has been defined as "the area of study, research and practice that places a priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide". Problems that transcend national borders or have a global political and economic impact are often emphasized. Thus, global health is about worldwide health improvement (including mental health), reduction of disparities, and protection against global threats that disregard national borders.

    Kagoya J.
    UG
    Kagoya J.

    The general gains in life expectancy as a measure of health status have arisen through improvements in primary health care. However, in developing regions and even in a lot of developed countries the emphasis in health care is still on curative measures rather than preventative ones.

    Ahmed A.
    KE
    Ahmed A.

    Global health had previous history which was lower than today.as you see the introduction .

    Mukelabai Coster M.
    ZM
    Mukelabai Coster M.

    At this module could also have included health problems that affect men generally. It looks like it was more on women and infants related health problems and somehow lacked that aspect that deals with men such as prostate and other age related ailments.

    Hafsah D.
    NG
    Hafsah D.

    Is the health of population in a global context.it has been defined as the area of study,research and practice thAt places a priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide.

    Hafsah D.
    NG
    Hafsah D.

    What are the need for global health

    Bitrus S.
    NG
    Bitrus S.

    varying health conditions in places depicts different life expectancy.

    Zeeshan J.
    AU
    Zeeshan J.

    Global health Compare the data on each graph. What observations can you make about more developed and less developed regions? Global life expectancy today is approximately 62 years for males and 67 years for females as a result of the reduction in mortality since World War Two. This is on an approximate level with the life expectancy of developed countries in the 1950s. The gap between the life expectancy in developing and industrialised nations has narrowed from approximately 25 years in the early 1950s, to 12 years in the early 1990s. However, there are still areas in the world where life expectancy is in fact dropping. Rwanda is one example, where war has reduced life expectancy based on World Health Organisation ( WHO) figures from 46.7 years in 1985 - 1990 to 22.6 years in 1990 - 1995. The general gains in life expectancy as a measure of health status have arisen through improvements in primary health care. However, in developing regions and even in a lot of developed countries the emphasis in health care is still on curative measures rather than preventative ones. WHO data shows that in 1994, 18 per cent of the world's population in rural areas had access to sanitation compared with 70 per cent in urban areas. 63 per cent of the world's population in rural areas had access to safe water compared with 82 per cent in urban areas. These differences in health status related to access to primary health are not confined to developing countries

    Zeeshan J.
    AU
    Zeeshan J.

    Health and Human Development - global health Global health Compare the data on each graph. What observations can you make about more developed and less developed regions? Global life expectancy today is approximately 62 years for males and 67 years for females as a result of the reduction in mortality since World War Two. This is on an approximate level with the life expectancy of developed countries in the 1950s. The gap between the life expectancy in developing and industrialised nations has narrowed from approximately 25 years in the early 1950s, to 12 years in the early 1990s. However, there are still areas in the world where life expectancy is in fact dropping. Rwanda is one example, where war has reduced life expectancy based on World Health Organisation ( WHO) figures from 46.7 years in 1985 - 1990 to 22.6 years in 1990 - 1995. The general gains in life expectancy as a measure of health status have arisen through improvements in primary health care. However, in developing regions and even in a lot of developed countries the emphasis in health care is still on curative measures rather than preventative ones. WHO data shows that in 1994, 18 per cent of the world's population in rural areas had access to sanitation compared with 70 per cent in urban areas. 63 per cent of the world's population in rural areas had access to safe water compared with 82 per cent in urban areas. These differences in health status related to access to primary health are not confined to developing countries

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