Loading

Module 1: Percepção visual

Nota de Estudos
Study Reminders
Support
Text Version

Set your study reminders

We will email you at these times to remind you to study.
  • Monday

    -

    7am

    +

    Tuesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Wednesday

    -

    7am

    +

    Thursday

    -

    7am

    +

    Friday

    -

    7am

    +

    Saturday

    -

    7am

    +

    Sunday

    -

    7am

    +


Psychology -> Monocular depth cues

Monocular depth cues

Focusing on the eye of a needle. A monocular or binocular depth cue? IMAGE

Linear Perspective: A secondary monocular depth cue where parallel lines appear to converge, creating a sense of distance. This can be observed when standing in the middle of railroad tracks. Click here to view a short video on linear perspective.

Interposition: A secondary monocular depth cue where one object which is closer, obscures another, more distant object. For example, if a fence obscures part of a house, we know that the fence is in front of the house.

Interposition IMAGE

Texture Gradients: A secondary monocular depth cue where the amount of detail in a scene decreases as the distance increases. For example, if you look at a field of sunflowers, the closer flowers are more detailed while the distant flowers are less distinct and more hazy.

Texture Gradients IMAGE.

Relative size: A secondary monocular depth cue where if separate objects are expected to be of the same size, the larger ones are seen as being closer. If an artist wishes to depict two objects of the same size at different distances, creating a sense of depth and distance on a 2-dimensional surface, they would draw the more distant object smaller.

Height in the visual field (Also referred to as height in horizontal plane): A secondary monocular depth cue which reflects the fact that distant objects appear higher in a picture and near objects are low in the visual field. In this way, artists create a sense of depth and distance in their work.

Accommodation: A primary monocular depth cue which involves the adjustment of the shape of the lens to change the focus of the eye. The lens bulges when focusing on nearby objects, such as the eye of a needle, and elongates to focus on distant objects, such as a bird flying.