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Topic12

  • Note di Apprendimento
  • Revisione degli argomenti
    Kagoya J.
    UG
    Kagoya J.

    STARTING THE TREATMENT OF HIV/AIDS WITH ART: Whether you have recently found out you have HIV or have known for a while, you may have questions about starting HIV treatment. You may have heard about HIV treatment – also called antiretroviral treatment (ART) – or know someone else who is taking it. Talk to your doctor about any questions you have - the information on this page should help you to think about the questions you might want to ask. Can HIV be treated? HIV can be treated. Many people living with HIV start taking treatment and stay healthy as a result. Current treatment for HIV is not a cure for HIV, but it can keep HIV under control. Antiretroviral treatment works by keeping the level of HIV in your body low (your viral load). This lets your immune system recover and stay strong. Keeping your viral load low also helps to prevent HIV being passed on. With good healthcare and treatment, many people with HIV are living just as long as people who don’t have HIV.1 You can continue to have relationships, to work or study, to make plans, to have a family – whatever you would have done before your HIV diagnosis. When should I start treatment? Without treatment, people living with HIV can become ill because of the damage HIV does to the immune system. The immune system is your body’s way of protecting itself from illnesses caused by germs, bacteria or infections. It is now recommended that people living with HIV start antiretroviral treatment straight away.2 In many places, the decision about when to start treatment is still dependent upon on a CD4 count test, which looks at how many CD4 cells are in a small amount of blood.3 The CD4 cells (also called T-helper cells) are an important part of the immune system because they fight germs and infections. HIV attacks CD4 cells and reduces the number of them in your body. Without treatment, HIV slowly weakens the immune system, making it harder for your body to fight off illness or infection. You and your healthcare professional will discuss the best time to start treatment.

    Hafsah D.
    NG
    Hafsah D.

    Is it possible for everyone to be affected by this disease

    Aubrey M.
    ZA
    Aubrey M.

    What is the cause of discordant results either in individual or couple testing?

    GREG S.
    US
    GREG S.

    How does this keep going on?

    Benjamin M.
    US
    Benjamin M.

    who first contacted the disease ;hiv was it man or animals?

    Francis N.
    US
    Francis N.

    can there be cure of hiv

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