Il processo di acquisto dei clienti - 2
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Module 9: Tourism - Generating Sales

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Il processo di acquisto dei clienti - 2

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Tourism - Marketing and Promotion
Generating Sales
The Customer Buying Process - 2

Developing Customer Preferences for What is Being Sold
Once customers are convinced that the product is of a high quality, promotional campaigns should convince them that it is superior to similar products. The commercial rivalry between Hertz and Avis also provides an example for this stage of the customer buying process.

In 1965, Hertz issued an ad campaign with the headline “We’re no. 1 for a reason”. The campaign highlighted the advantages Hertz had by being the market leader. Like Avis’s ads, Hertz’s campaign indirectly referred to their main rival. The ads noted that Hertz had 2,900 locations worldwide, which was “twice as many as no. 2”. Furthermore, they highlighted the superior lengths they will go to ensure customer satisfaction. The ad states “if our service is not up to Hertz standards we give you $50 in free rentals. It then says “no.2 gives you a quarter and an apology”.

Developing Customer Preferences for What is Being Sold
These statements helped to develop customer preferences toward Hertz by implying that it was the biggest car rental company therefore there must be reasons for its success.

The campaign stopped customers moving to Avis from Hertz and ensured that it remained the favourite for a large percentage of the target market. For the next few decades, Hertz maintained a 48% market share while Avis had 35%.

Persuading the Customer to Purchase
Naturally, if a customer has decided that a service provider has the best product, they will purchase that product. However, promotional campaigns do not aim to promote one-time purchases from customers. Rather, they hope that the first purchase will lead to the customer developing brand loyalty.

Once a customer becomes loyal to a brand they will choose that company over others whenever possible. For example, they will always fly with United Airlines or will stay in a Holiday Inn for all business trips. The process involved in creating brand loyalty is known as adoption.

Persuading the Customer to Purchase
Marketers must try to foster adoption by developing a long term relationship with customers. This can be done by incorporating personalised messages in a campaign strategy. Today, personalised messages are mostly sent via e-mail. E-mail provides a direct yet unobtrusive way of communicating with customers.

For example, a travel agent may send a tourist an itinerary of their trip in an e-mail. Personalised promotion helps customers to feel that they are appreciated and that the company views them as an individual.

Convincing the Tourist to Purchase Again
Once adoption has taken place, it is important to encourage repeat purchasing in tourists. Generally, customers do not like to look for new service providers because of the time and effort involved. They are only motivated to do so if they have an exceptionally bad experience with a company. Therefore, if a company is operating at a high standard they are likely to receive a lot of repeat business.

Repeat business can be gained by advertising directly to customers that have purchased products before. For example, hotels often e-mail past customers and offer them reductions on their next stay. Advertising to past customers is an excellent way of generating repeat business as it helps customers to feel appreciated. Furthermore, it helps to ensure that they maintain their brand loyalty.

It is also very important to incorporate repeat business into a promotional strategy as it is far less time-consuming and expensive to convince existing customers to buy again than to convince new customers to make a purchase.

END OF UNIT:
The Customer Buying Process - 2

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