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12 Procedura di Accoglienza servizio superiore

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Diploma in Customer Service
Customer Service in the Hospitality Industry
The 12 Steps of Superior Hospitality Service

The 12 Steps of Superior Hospitality Service
In the previous unit we learned about the needs and mind-set of the hospitality customer. Once a hospitality manager is confident that his/her employees fully comprehend these needs, he/she should aim to provide the highest level of customer service possible.

This can be achieved by teaching staff the 12 steps of Superior Hospitality Service. These steps are as follows:

1. Maintain a Pleasing Environment
Staff must ensure the establishment is decorated in an agreeable and identifiable style. All furniture in the building must be comfortable.

Furthermore, background music and lighting should be used when and where appropriate.

It is important that every area of the building be kept clean and sanitized as well as being tidy and presentable.

2. Make a Favourable First Impression
Upon arriving at the hotel/guest-house customers should be welcomed by employees that are smiling and polite. Staff should be dressed in appropriate attire and conduct themselves with a professional composure.

Following check-in, an appointed employee should escort the guest to his/her room and make any adjustments the customer may need for his/her comfort.

Also, every employee must acknowledge current residents as they pass them. If an employee is familiar with a customer they may address him/her with their formal title e.g. Mr/Mrs Smith. When a staff member does not know a patron he/she should simply nod his/her head to the customer.

3. Train New Employees
To ensure that all employees are sure of their duties and responsibilities, detailed job descriptions should be created for all positions. These will provide a guide for new employees and serve as a reference for more experienced employees.

On their first day of work new members of staff should receive a workplace orientation from the HR Manager. This will help to relieve any confusion or uncertainty the staff member may have about the new organization.

Initially, new staff should be paired with experienced and dependable employees that can provide help and guidance when necessary.
This will allow new employees to learn “on the job”. Furthermore, it will prevent new staff from making mistakes which reflect poorly on the business. Staff should only be allowed to have unsupervised contact with customers when they have received a sufficient amount of training.

4. Develop the Professionalism of Management and Staff
Experienced members of staff should be re-trained in their core responsibilities as well as trained in new skills. This will prevent staff from adopting poor habits as well as constantly improving their skill set.

This policy will create an environment in which staff constantly aspire to provide excellent service. Experienced employees will create a loyal following and will be asked for customers by name.

5. Establish Systems of Flawless Communication in the Business
Systems of communication should be established between all departments in the business. This ensures that any request or purchase a customer makes can be fulfilled as quickly as possible.

Furthermore, all departments should keep and update a list of information which they need to make other departments aware of. For example, if a customer informs a member of reception staff that he/she has a food allergy, that employee should take note of this information and inform restaurant and kitchen staff immediately.

6. Answer Clients’ Questions
The entire staff must be well-versed in hotel and restaurant terms and know the answers to all possible clients’ questions about the area, the establishment and the range of services offered.

The restaurant staff must know the menu well, including details such as availability, recipes, main ingredients, preparation time, etc.

If an employee does not know the answer to a question, he must excuse himself find out the answer and return with it in a timely manner, or ask the manager to respond.

7. Accommodate All Reasonable Wishes of the Customer
Employees must make every effort to accommodate the needs and wishes of the customer relating to the scope of their job, and do it with a smile.

Employees must do this even when the request sounds strange (for example, a guest asking for a coffee at an unusual hour).

8. Encourage Team Spirit
Management should create work groups in every department that work together harmoniously. Members of these teams should help and support each other.

If a member of the team is unexpectedly absent, another member should complete his/her duties for the benefit of the entire team.

9. Amenities and Presents for the Customer
Small value items for which the guest does not have to pay for are a very welcome gift. Traditionally hotels, in accordance with their star classification, provide the guest with amenities in the guest room and bathroom (pen and writing paper, shampoo, hair conditioner, soap, etc.). Some larger hotels place chocolate mints on the pillow during turn in service; others offer free coffee at departure.

Restaurants frequently offer free drinks (mostly to the customers who wait for a table) and sometimes small appetizers, relishes, crudités, etc.

You may want to offer a small glass of local juice upon welcoming a client. Customers remember and appreciate free items, become free advertisers and often return.

10. Offer Incentives for Personnel
Several hotel and restaurant chains in Europe and the U.S. have established incentive programs for their staff to reward quality of performance.

The award usually consists of a leisure activity such as dinner for two or tickets to a show. Another incentive would be to award a title such as “Employee of the Month”. A less frequently used incentive is to give the employee a monetary award. Such incentives have been used in hotels for decades and have proven results.

Another mode of incentive is to have employees vote for the “Employee of the Month”. This method is notable in that it makes staff feel appreciated by their co-workers as well as management.

Regardless of the incentive method used, awards should be taken into account when an employee is considered for a promotion.

11. Supervision
When first starting to implement a quality program with the training of the employees, the owner/manager/supervisor must continually observe and discreetly correct the staff.

As the service improves and the new system gains roots, he/she can begin delegating parts of the supervision, while always maintaining the position of ultimate authority.

12. Management Inspections
The best way to evaluate the progress in quality service is by inspections, both at regular intervals and by surprise.

The manager must create an inspection sheet for quality of performance; where on the left side will be the names of all employees by department, and on the right columns with dates on the top, where he/she will evaluate employee’s performance with ratings for quality, ranging from 1 (unacceptable), to 5 (superb).

When filled without bias, this sheet will clearly show progress from each inspection to the next. In addition to quality evaluation, it can also serve as a guide for promotion and dismissal decisions.

END OF UNIT:
The 12 Steps of Superior Hospitality Service

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