Les campagnes pour le changement
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Les campagnes pour le changement

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  • Notes d'étude
  • Révisions du sujet
    Tashika B.
    US
    Tashika B.

    We have to approach mental illness and or disabilities with more empathy.

    Peter Awuni A.
    GH
    Peter Awuni A.

    Insightful lectures, great

    Kathy L.
    US
    Kathy L.

    Shame and stigma still exist unfortunately

    Chelsea-leah L.
    GB
    Chelsea-leah L.

    It seems that the situation has completely swapped ends, before the problem was that people were being instuinalised unnecessarily where as now people who actually need that level of help are struggling and having to fight to get it because of lack of beds, interesting.

    Darrell L.
    US
    Darrell L.

    The abolishment of the 1913 Mental Deficiency Act with the 1959 Mental Health Act was a positive step for people living in mental institutions. By that time thousands of individuals were locked up in these institutions without a diagnosis. This act helped thousands get released and/or reclassified correctly.

    Louise M.
    GB
    Louise M.

    its all very sad how people was treated but in a way its still the same today without money people with menatl health are abused or without support wher as rich people can go private and get the best care the uk has seen some of the worst goverment cuts to mental health it wasnt that long a go the goverment did try and silence a man who wrote abook about growning up with mental health problems and how he was treated stigma is still a big problem when it comes to mental health today its wrong and still today its hush hush example you will see tv adverts programs about nearly every medical problem but how offten do you see about mental health unless its about cuts

    Peter M.
    AU
    Peter M.

    In recalling past actions taken in response to mental illness it is wise to note that these old theories and strategies can reappear under a different guise. We can well regret the actions of the past but many of those attitudes still exist and present bias and discrimination in the form of labeling that creates stereotypes and fuels social stigma.

    Peter M.
    AU
    Peter M.

    While the professional development may have played a role ending institutional care I believe it was the Human Rights organisations, the self advocates and advocates for change that actually created the change. Economies of Scale lurk deep in government minds with cluster housing and special care facilities still playing a role. In the Australian context much faith is put into a National Disability Insurance Scheme to provide more real opportunities for people with a disability or mental health issue.

    Nicola H.
    GB
    Nicola H.

    I think this module shows that treatments and how people are treated has changed over the years, but the systems now still needs work.

    ANGELA R.
    US
    ANGELA R.

    I can not believe that was going on in the 1950's.

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