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Templo de Portunus

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    Helen B.
    GB
    Helen B.

    Interesting to see the evolution of early buildings and statuary. I now understand more about gothic architecture, rather just recognising it from the overall style - heavenly / golden ratio / wheys drawn to heavens / emotional

    Heike K.
    US
    Heike K.

    The Temple of Portunus (Italian: Tempio di Portuno) or Temple of Fortuna Virilis ("manly fortune") is a Roman temple in Rome, one of the best preserved of all Roman temples. Its dedication remains unclear, as ancient sources mention several temples in this area of Rome, without saying enough to make it clear which this is. It was called the Temple of Fortuna Virilis from the Renaissance, and remains better known by this name. If dedicated to Portunus, god of keys, doors and livestock, and so granaries, it is the main temple dedicated to the god in the city.

    Kenneth M.
    ZW
    Kenneth M.

    an ancient building dedicated to a god

    Kenneth M.
    ZW
    Kenneth M.

    influence of roman culture

    Roggenfrau N.
    CA
    Roggenfrau N.

    The Temple of Portunus, dating to the first century B.C., is a rare survivor of Roman Republican architecture and a reminder of the former magnificence of the Forum Boarium, a major commercial area along the banks of the Tiber in antiquity. The temple was dedicated to Portunus, a youthful god associated with water crossings and seaports. The rectangular building rests on a high podium with a single flight of steps leading to a pronaos, or portico, and a single cella. The combination of this typical Etruscan ground plan and the temple’s Greek Ionic columns is characteristic of Roman Republican period architecture. The structure was built out of travertine and tuff, originally plastered to imitate Greek marble. The frieze is decorated with garlands, putti, candelabra, and the popular ancient bucranium or ox-skull motif. The building was converted into a Christian church in the ninth century, when the interior of the cella was decorated with a fine cycle of frescoes depicting scenes from the life of Mary. This undoubtedly saved it from being pulled apart for building materials. In the 1920s the temple was freed of additions that had been added over time, and some conservation measures were taken to protect the structure. https://www.wmf.org/project/temple-portunus

    Jason K.
    US
    Jason K.

    Are there photos or video of the interior?

    Claire F.
    GB
    Claire F.

    has the 1st video meant to have sound please

    Khadidja B.
    DZ
    Khadidja B.

    i need subtitle

    Mohamed A.
    EG
    Mohamed A.

    hwo was it used and it's volume wasn't huge ?

    Mohamed A.
    EG
    Mohamed A.

    how was it used and it's volume wasn't huge ?

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