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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management


Comments about The use/evaluation phase - The Use/Evaluation Phase: auditing the system

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- Module: The use/evaluation phase
- Topic: The Use/Evaluation Phase: auditing the system

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  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya continual monitoring process should be in place to ensure that the system is producing accurate information. In systems where there are no mandatory audits required, often the company will create checks of its own to ensure the accuracy of information being produced. A common example of this would be a stock take where the stock levels on the shelves are compared with the information contained within the system to ensure accuracy. These audits of the system will be built into the standard operating procedures of the company.
    2014-11-19 12:11:03

  • Janvier Nyandamu Rwanda Next step is auditing the system, this is a continual monitoring process, to ensure that the system is producing the right information.
    2014-11-12 09:11:39

  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana Internal auditors play a valuable role in ensuring that IT investments are well-managed and have a positive impact on an organization. Their assurance role supports senior management, the audit committee, the board of directors, and other stakeholders. Internal auditors need to take a risk-based approach in planning their many activities on IT project audits. With limited audit resources, auditors must focus on the highest-risk project areas, while adding value to the organization. Audit best practices suggest internal auditors should be involved throughout a project's life cycle — not just in post-implementation assessments. Converting from old to new computer systems is an important, but often underestimated, aspect of IT projects. Implementing a new system usually requires a variety of system changes, production data conversion and migration, and new operational policies and procedures. Each of these areas poses significant risk to the organization during the actual system conversion. Consequently, conversion audit efforts typically focus on reviewing plans and results for: The overall implementation of the IT solution. The systems that are required to implement the IT solution. The operational changes required within the organization as part of the implementation. When planning system conversion audits, auditors need a good understanding of the business requirements for the system, the project's risks, and how the proposed system will work. To understand the solution, they must identify the various operational and system changes that will be implemented. Also, because project information usually becomes available over time, some audit planning will have to be completed on an iterative basis.
    2014-11-08 19:11:54

  • Nothando Gumpo United Kingdom Here a continual monitoring system should be in place to ensure that the results produced by system are accurate. However in systems that don't require mandatory monitoring, a company can create its own checks to ensure accuracy of results being produced. This can be done through stock taking, with stock levels on the shelves are compared with those on the system to ensure accuracy. These audits can then be built into the standard operating procedures of the company.
    2014-11-05 22:11:40

  • Kenneth M Akahoho Ghana In this area a continual monitoring process should be in place to ensure that the system is producing accurate information. In systems where there are no mandatory audits required, often the company will create checks of its own to ensure the accuracy of information being produced. A common example of this would be a stock take where the stock levels on the shelves are compared with the information contained within the system to ensure accuracy. These audits of the system will be built into the standard operating procedures of the company.
    2014-10-26 12:10:46

  • Ralph Webster South Africa In this area a continual monitoring process should be in place to ensure that the system is producing accurate information. In systems where there are no mandatory audits required, often the company will create checks of its own to ensure the accuracy of information being produced. A common example of this would be a stock take where the stock levels on the shelves are compared with the information contained within the system to ensure accuracy. These audits of the system will be built into the standard operating procedures of the company.
    2014-10-20 08:10:25

  • George Fragos Greece who are responsible for the auditing?
    2014-10-02 07:10:34

  • Fitzroy Hugh Fagan Jamaica Why is gather user data important to the success of the project?
    2014-09-23 01:09:31

  • Shewangizaw Zenebe Ethiopia For the sake to be genuine the auditing system should be undertaken by the external body rather than in terms team to ensure impartiality.
    2014-09-17 13:09:19

  • ANNETTE ROBINSON United States of America So this phase never ends?
    2014-09-09 21:09:33

    • Rakhmat Alfian Indonesia actually yes, but we have to make a contract with client how evaluation and revision going after implementation phase. such as we only accept 3 times evaluasion, which we don't accept big revision of the project
      2014-10-28 05:10:59
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 21:07:53

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 21:07:32

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 21:07:15

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 21:07:58

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 21:07:42

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 21:07:18

  • ToeToe Aung Singapore What are the standard operating procedures of the company?
    2014-07-01 14:07:40

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan They are set of rules that were laid down during planning, analysis and designing phases of SDLC.
      2014-08-26 18:08:58
    • Glyn Chapman United Kingdom The S.O.P's are the way in which the company operates in it's normal functioning state and it is the company who put the various checks in place to confirm or dispute whether the new system is hindering or aiding in maintaining the S.O.P's of the company and or the system.
      2014-07-22 19:07:54
    • Daniel Chol Koknyin South Sudan The company will create checks of its own to ensure the accuracy of information being produced.
      2014-07-06 15:07:58
  • Satu Korhonen Finland Why is auditing important?
    2014-06-26 18:06:32

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Is the tool used to check if the operating procedures are followed.
      2014-08-26 18:08:09
  • Reza Abbasi Iran Who is accomplished by In many systems monitoring methods are agencies?
    2014-06-22 17:06:35

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan The question you ask is not clear can you frame it well?
      2014-08-26 18:08:02
  • Reza Abbasi Iran Who is accomplished by In many systems monitoring methods are agencies?
    2014-06-20 13:06:14

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