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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management


Comments about The implementation phase - The Implementation Phase: developing an implementation schedule

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- Module: The implementation phase
- Topic: The Implementation Phase: developing an implementation schedule

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  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya Once all of the elements of the new system are in place, the next step is to develop the implementation schedule (or cutover), and finally to cut over to the new system. Most systems have a staggered introduction - that is, elements of the system are introduced one at a time so that it is possible to ensure that they are working as intended before the next element is introduced. This is a common approach as it allows the developers to quickly isolate problems in individual sections of the system. If more than one element of the system is introduced at the same time and there is a problem, it may take some time to isolate where the problem is occurring.
    2014-11-19 12:11:52

  • Janvier Nyandamu Rwanda While developing an implementation schedule, staggered system is either used or parallel system implementation when the new system is not compatible with the existing one.
    2014-11-12 08:11:09

  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana During the development phase, everything that will be needed to implement the project is arranged. Potential suppliers or subcontractors are brought in, a schedule is made, materials and tools are ordered, instructions are given to the personnel and so forth. The development phase is complete when implementation is ready to start. All matters must be clear for the parties that will carry out the implementation. In some projects, particularly smaller ones, a formal development phase is probably not necessary. The important point is that it must be clear what must be done in the implementation phase, by whom and when. The project takes shape during the implementation phase. This phase involves the construction of the actual project result. Programmers are occupied with encoding, designers are involved in developing graphic material, contractors are building, the actual reorganization takes place. It is during this phase that the project becomes visible to outsiders, to whom it may appear that the project has just begun. The implementation phase is the doing phase, and it is important to maintain the momentum. In one project, it had escaped the project teams. attention that one of the most important team members was expecting to become a father at any moment and would thereafter be completely unavailable for about a month. When the time came, an external specialist was brought in to take over his work, in order to keep the team from grinding to a halt. Although the team was able to proceed, the external expertise put a considerable dent in the budget.
    2014-11-08 18:11:52

  • Nothando Gumpo United Kingdom However the staggered introduction is commonly referred to as a "cutover". This is because the two systems cut over one another as each element is introduced. This is by far the most preferred method of introducing a new computer system however there are times when it is not possible to do this. Where the ability to introduce the system in sections is not available, - for example, the new system is not compatible with the existing equipment, which will be disposed of when the new system in commissioned - a different implementation method must be used. Most commonly, it will be one that involves the use of parallel systems. As the name suggests, parallel system implementation is where two systems (the current and the new ones) are being run at the same time to perform the same job. While this duplicates the work, there are some significant advantages to this type of system. As the performance of the existing system is a known quantity, it gives us something to compare the performance and accuracy of the new system to. Often parallel systems will operate for a month or two before the old system is decommissioned. The biggest problem with parallel systems is that the duplication of the work can be costly however this must be viewed against the security of the knowledge that if the new system under performs, the old system can be kept operating until such time as all problems with the new system are sorted out.
    2014-11-05 23:11:11

  • Nothando Gumpo United Kingdom During this phase, once all of the elements of the new system are in place, the next step is to develop the implementation schedule (or cutover), and finally to cut over to the new system. Most systems have a staggered introduction - that is, elements of the system are introduced one at a time so that it is possible to ensure that they are working as intended before the next element is introduced. This is a common approach as it allows the developers to quickly isolate problems in individual sections of the system. If more than one element of the system is introduced at the same time and there is a problem, it may take some time to isolate where the problem is occurring.
    2014-11-05 23:11:36

  • Nothando Gumpo United Kingdom Where the new system requires the old hardware and/or software to be removed, and it is not possible to have a cutover program or parallel systems, the only option available is the use of a trial system. This is where a small version of the system is set up and tried before the widespread introduction of the system. This trial emulates all aspects of the computer system to ensure that it will work properly. It aims to reproduce as closely as possible the "real life" situation the system will be used in. If the system is to be used in a number of locations, often this trial will occur in a single location which crosses over to the new system and evaluates its performance until it is satisfactory, at which time it is then introduced to the rest of the company.
    2014-11-05 23:11:17

  • Assel Satpayeva Kazakhstan I would prefer a gradual introduction or Parallel. It gives time to implement the new system in an effective way for all the users: novices, Intermediate and expert.
    2014-10-29 07:10:06

  • Ralph Webster South Africa This staggered introduction is commonly referred to as a "cutover". This is because the two systems cut over one another as each element is introduced. This is by far the most preferred method of introducing a new computer system however there are times when it is not possible to do this. Where the ability to introduce the system in sections is not available, - for example, the new system is not compatible with the existing equipment, which will be disposed of when the new system in commissioned - a different implementation method must be used. Most commonly, it will be one that involves the use of parallel systems. As the name suggests, parallel system implementation is where two systems (the current and the new ones) are being run at the same time to perform the same job. While this duplicates the work, there are some significant advantages to this type of system. As the performance of the existing system is a known quantity, it gives us something to compare the performance and accuracy of the new system to. Often parallel systems will operate for a month or two before the old system is decommissioned. The biggest problem with parallel systems is that the duplication of the work can be costly however this must be viewed against the security of the knowledge that if the new system under performs, the old system can be kept operating until such time as all problems with the new system are sorted out. Where the new system requires the old hardware and/or software to be removed, and it is not possible to have a cutover program or parallel systems, the only option available is the use of a trial system. This is where a small version of the system is set up and tried before the widespread introduction of the system. This trial emulates all aspects of the computer system to ensure that it will work properly. It aims to reproduce as closely as possible the "real life" situation the system will be used in. If the system is to be used in a number of locations, often this trial will occur in a single location which crosses over to the new system and evaluates its performance until it is satisfactory, at which time it is then introduced to the rest of the company.
    2014-10-20 08:10:44

  • Ralph Webster South Africa This staggered introduction is commonly referred to as a "cutover". This is because the two systems cut over one another as each element is introduced. This is by far the most preferred method of introducing a new computer system however there are times when it is not possible to do this. Where the ability to introduce the system in sections is not available, - for example, the new system is not compatible with the existing equipment, which will be disposed of when the new system in commissioned - a different implementation method must be used. Most commonly, it will be one that involves the use of parallel systems. As the name suggests, parallel system implementation is where two systems (the current and the new ones) are being run at the same time to perform the same job. While this duplicates the work, there are some significant advantages to this type of system. As the performance of the existing system is a known quantity, it gives us something to compare the performance and accuracy of the new system to. Often parallel systems will operate for a month or two before the old system is decommissioned. The biggest problem with parallel systems is that the duplication of the work can be costly however this must be viewed against the security of the knowledge that if the new system under performs, the old system can be kept operating until such time as all problems with the new system are sorted out. Where the new system requires the old hardware and/or software to be removed, and it is not possible to have a cutover program or parallel systems, the only option available is the use of a trial system. This is where a small version of the system is set up and tried before the widespread introduction of the system. This trial emulates all aspects of the computer system to ensure that it will work properly. It aims to reproduce as closely as possible the "real life" situation the system will be used in. If the system is to be used in a number of locations, often this trial will occur in a single location which crosses over to the new system and evaluates its performance until it is satisfactory, at which time it is then introduced to the rest of the company.
    2014-10-20 08:10:10

  • George Fragos Greece is problem for the new system a poorly trained clerk?or a cleark does not like to operate new system?
    2014-10-02 07:10:53

  • Shewangizaw Zenebe Ethiopia Why is it necessary to prepare work plan? Development work plan helps to an implementer to when an activity to be executed
    2014-09-18 13:09:58

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 20:07:58

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 20:07:46

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 20:07:34

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 20:07:19

  • ToeToe Aung Singapore A rapid transition from one phase to another phase in the project is called cutover. What is the difference between using parallel and phased?
    2014-07-01 09:07:28

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Old system.
      2014-08-26 14:08:57
    • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
      2014-07-20 20:07:48
    • Andre Rishi United States of America Actually, a cutover is not a rapid transition from one phase to another, rather, it is when you introduce new parts of the system into the old system in a staggered way as a means of slowly, piece by piece, bringing the new system online. The difference between a parallel and staggered introduction of the new system is that running a parallel system means that the old system and the new system are both online at the same time; whereas a staggered system simply means that just part of the new system is introduced online while the part of the old system is taken offline.
      2014-07-05 12:07:29
  • Reza Abbasi Iran What is the staggered introduction commonly referred to?
    2014-06-22 16:06:59

    • Satu Korhonen Finland Cutover
      2014-06-26 18:06:21
  • Reza Abbasi Iran what is the next step Once all of the elements of the new system are in place?
    2014-06-20 13:06:56

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan pilot phase
      2014-08-26 14:08:25
    • Mulalo Nengwenda South Africa development and implementing schedule
      2014-08-20 10:08:05
  • Annette Weizbauer Germany What is the staggered introduction commonly referred to?
    2014-06-16 19:06:38

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Pilot phase.
      2014-08-26 14:08:13
    • Mulalo Nengwenda South Africa cutover
      2014-08-20 10:08:24
    • Reza Abbasi Iran This staggered introduction is commonly referred to as a "cutover".
      2014-06-20 13:06:30
    • Reza Abbasi Iran Most systems have a staggered introduction - that is, elements of the system are introduced one at a time so that it is possible to ensure that they are working as intended before the next element is introduced. This is a common approach as it allows the developers to quickly isolate problems in individual sections of the system. If more than one element of the system is introduced at the same time and there is a problem, it may take some time to isolate where the problem is occurring.
      2014-06-20 13:06:41
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