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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management


Comments about The implementation phase - The Implementation Phase: educating users

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- Module: The implementation phase
- Topic: The Implementation Phase: educating users

Latest Comments

  • Zinabie Tadesse Gebremedhin Ethiopia it is important that all of the users are educated in the use of the new system. While this is an obvious step, it is a very important step in the success of the new system. There are a number of training strategies a company might employ when implementing a new system - from onsite training to specialist courses. Some of the factors that will need to be taken into consideration when designing a training program include: the existing skill sets within the company, the extent of the change, the funds available and the number of users to be trained. In addition to this, decisions made in the implementation plan will have an impact on the training programs as well. This is because there may be elements of a proposed training program that cannot be carried out until other parts of the implementation program are complete. It is important that all users of the system are trained in its operation. If the customers of the company are one of the direct users groups of the system (such as bank customers and ATMs) then they will need to be included in the education program. Customer training increases the complexity of the program.
    2014-11-27 10:11:11

  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya it is important that all of the users are educated in the use of the new system.
    2014-11-19 12:11:21

  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana The Implementation Phase: educating users is one of the important aspect in a project management or building business. This likely prevent excessive destruction and maintenance in the industrial systems. Users of systems must well trained to avoid damage to the system. In every area of business either in office or project fields, proper or basic training is need for the operation of system or others machinery and or items for a particular projects.
    2014-11-08 18:11:45

  • Nothando Gumpo United Kingdom Therefore having created the environment for the deployment of the new system, it is important that all of the users are educated in the use of the new system. While this is an obvious step, it is a very important step in the success of the new system. There are a number of training strategies a company might employ when implementing a new system - from onsite training to specialist courses. Some of the factors that will need to be taken into consideration when designing a training program include: the existing skill sets within the company, the extent of the change, the funds available and the number of users to be trained. In addition to this, decisions made in the implementation plan will have an impact on the training programs as well. This is because there may be elements of a proposed training program that cannot be carried out until other parts of the implementation program are complete. For example, the training program cannot commence until after the new software has been written and tested, or if the training program is to involve "hands on" experience with the new hardware, this cannot happen until after the new equipment has been installed. It is important that all users of the system are trained in its operation. If the customers of the company are one of the direct users groups of the system (such as bank customers and ATMs) then they will need to be included in the education program. Customer training increases the complexity of the program. This is because there is significantly less control over the training that can be given to the customers. By this, it is meant that, while it can be mandated for employees to undergo an education program.
    2014-11-05 23:11:58

  • Ralph Webster South Africa Having created the environment for the deployment of the new system, it is important that all of the users are educated in the use of the new system. While this is an obvious step, it is a very important step in the success of the new system. There are a number of training strategies a company might employ when implementing a new system - from onsite training to specialist courses. Some of the factors that will need to be taken into consideration when designing a training program include: the existing skill sets within the company, the extent of the change, the funds available and the number of users to be trained. In addition to this, decisions made in the implementation plan will have an impact on the training programs as well. This is because there may be elements of a proposed training program that cannot be carried out until other parts of the implementation program are complete. For example, the training program cannot commence until after the new software has been written and tested, or if the training program is to involve "hands on" experience with the new hardware, this cannot happen until after the new equipment has been installed. It is important that all users of the system are trained in its operation. If the customers of the company are one of the direct users groups of the system (such as bank customers and ATMs) then they will need to be included in the education program. Customer training increases the complexity of the program. This is because there is significantly less control over the training that can be given to the customers. (By this, it is meant that, while it can be mandated for employees to undergo an education program, you cannot make customers do this, even if it is in their best interest
    2014-10-20 08:10:57

  • Isaac Arok Garang South Sudan I am going to finishing my Diploma in Project Management very soon.
    2014-10-05 21:10:06

  • George Fragos Greece training took place every year??
    2014-10-02 07:10:20

    • Robert Robert Nigeria it depends, it may be weekly, depending on the system upgrade. So it depends on change.
      2014-10-14 15:10:52
  • Segedin Dragan United Arab Emirates When and on which stage education program should be defined (in contract?) as is well known that the complexity of the education program delivery increases?
    2014-09-28 09:09:58

  • Fitzroy Hugh Fagan Jamaica Why is the "skill set" of the user of the process important?.
    2014-09-23 01:09:44

    • Linda Manzano United States of America the skill it will help to delivery the project on time. if the team have someone with not knowledge of what they are doing that can push back the project. so is really important that the person need to have skill set.
      2014-10-10 02:10:51
  • Shewangizaw Zenebe Ethiopia Why is it necessary to create awareness for the beneficiaries on the use and application of the equipment? The most important thing of creating awareness for the beneficiary is best use of the equipment and to avoid wastage of resource.
    2014-09-18 13:09:10

  • ARIHO SIMPLISIO Uganda why is implementation very important?
    2014-08-21 09:08:37

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan To get successful result.
      2014-08-26 14:08:15
    • Philip Pam Nigeria What's the point creating a system without implementation?
      2014-08-24 22:08:28
  • Mulalo Nengwenda South Africa whats the use of a customer training
    2014-08-20 10:08:51

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan To improve the services.
      2014-08-26 14:08:50
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 20:07:02

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan It is great information given.
      2014-08-26 14:08:39
    • Carlo Fourie South Africa Very informative, thank you.
      2014-07-21 10:07:10
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 20:07:48

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 20:07:35

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 20:07:14

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 20:07:52

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 20:07:38

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Operational support At the operational level are transaction processing systems through which products are designed, marketed, produced, and delivered. These systems accumulate information in databases that form the foundation for higher-level systems. In today's leading organizations, the information systems that support various functional units—marketing, finance, production, and human resources—are integrated into what is known as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. ERP systems support the entire sequence of activities, or value chain, through which a firm may add value to its goods and services. For example, an individual or other business may submit a custom order over the Web that automatically initiates “just-in-time” production to the customer's exact specifications through an approach known as mass customization. This involves sending orders to the firm's warehouses and suppliers to deliver materials just in time for a custom-production run. Finally, financial accounts are updated accordingly, and billing is initiated. Along with helping to integrate a firm's own value chain, transaction processing systems can also serve to integrate an organization's overall supply chain. This includes all of the various firms involved in designing, marketing, producing, and delivering the goods and services—from raw materials to final delivery. Thus, interorganizational information systems are essential to supply-chain management. For example, purchasing an item at a Wal-Mart store generates more than a cash register receipt; it also automatically sends a restocking order to the appropriate supplier. Suppliers can also access a retailer's inventory database over the Web to schedule efficient and timely deliveries. Many transaction processing systems support electronic commerce over the Internet. Among these are systems for on-line shopping, banking, and securities trading. Other systems deliver information, educational services, and entertainment on demand. Yet other systems serve to support the search for products with desired attributes, price discovery (for example, via an auction), and delivery of products in an electronic form (software, music, movies, or greeting cards). A growing array of specialized services and information-based products are offered by various organizations on the Web, as an infrastructure for electronic commerce is emerging on a global scale.
    2014-07-20 20:07:20

  • Satu Korhonen Finland What need to be taken into consideration when planning the training program?
    2014-06-26 18:06:47

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan The existing skills that the staff have and the benefits of the skills required.
      2014-08-26 14:08:10
    • Mulalo Nengwenda South Africa existing skill sets within the company, the extent of the change, the funds available and the number of users to be trained
      2014-08-20 10:08:45
    • Daniel Chol Koknyin South Sudan the existing skill sets within the company, the extent of the change, the funds available and the number of users to be trained. In addition to this, decisions made in the implementation plan will have an impact on the training programs as well.
      2014-07-06 13:07:20
    • Andre Rishi United States of America When planning a training program a company needs to take into consideration the skill level of the users of the new system and whether or not parts or all of the new system needs to be in place before training can begin. Also, the company needs to take into consideration whether or not the users of the new system will be staff (employees) or outside customers and/or clients.
      2014-07-04 13:07:04
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