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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management


Comments about The implementation phase - The Implementation Phase: acquisition of new equipment (hardware and software)

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- Module: The implementation phase
- Topic: The Implementation Phase: acquisition of new equipment (hardware and software)

Latest Comments

  • Memhir Meskelu Ethiopia very informative and relevant indeed.
    2014-12-15 00:12:54

  • Stephen Diya Nigeria In addition to acquiring new equipment, the old equipment must be dealt with as well.
    2014-12-13 19:12:11

  • Stephen Diya Nigeria Good
    2014-12-13 19:12:23

  • ESSOTOLOME BODJO China When considering hardware upgrades, issues such as the storage of the new equipment must be taken into consideration.
    2014-12-13 16:12:21

  • Lovejoy Matare Zimbabwe I can't seem to read all this module the Picture appears half and can't scroll down, someOne please help.
    2014-12-02 21:12:06

  • Caroline Omoro Kenya what factors should be considered when deciding whether to use new or old equipment?
    2014-11-30 14:11:17

  • Caroline Omoro Kenya For a successful system design process, there is need for acquiring new hardware and soft ware equipment. Working with Hardware equipment can include replacing PC's ,involving the government for upgrades in new guidelines and considering where the new equipment will be stored. Depending on the organization there will be statutory requirements to follow which sometimes can slow down the acquisition process.Thus careful planning is needed. The old system should also be dealt with appropriately.
    2014-11-30 14:11:08

  • Zinabie Tadesse Gebremedhin Ethiopia As part of the system design process, there may have been the requirement for new equipment (hardware and software) or upgrading of the existing equipment. As part of the planning for the implementation process, this new equipment must be obtained. While this sounds a simple task, it can often be a long and tiresome process. Depending upon the organisation, there might also be further company or statutory requirements to follow. For example, a Victorian Government Department would not be able to just go out and buy the equipment they need - they would need to conduct a tender. These sorts of requirements may slow the process down. It is very important that this phase of the process is handled properly. In addition to acquiring new equipment, the old equipment must be dealt with as well. It will be necessary to determine the most appropriate course of action for this - disposal, sale or redeployment within the organisation.
    2014-11-27 09:11:09

  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya f the system design process, there may have been the requirement for new equipment (hardware and software) or upgrading of the existing equipment. As part of the planning for the implementation process, this new equipment must be obtained. While this sounds a simple task, it can often be a long and tiresome process. For a large company, upgrading a system may involve replacing hundreds of PCs - and if the hardware is to be upgraded, there may be a number of different parts required for the different models of computers - all of which have to be sourced. Software might need to be purchased "off-the-shelf" then modified or custom-written to suit the specific needs of the system.
    2014-11-19 12:11:10

  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya the system design process, there may have been the requirement for new equipment (hardware and software) or upgrading of the existing equipment. As part of the planning for the implementation process, this new equipment must be obtained. While this sounds a simple task, it can often be a long and tiresome process. For a large company, upgrading a system may involve replacing hundreds of PCs - and if the hardware is to be upgraded, there may be a number of different parts required for the different models of computers - all of which have to be sourced. Software might need to be purchased "off-the-shelf" then modified or custom-written to suit the specific needs of the system.
    2014-11-19 12:11:00

  • Janvier Nyandamu Rwanda Acquisition of the new equipment and dealing with the old ones is the vital process in Implementation phase.
    2014-11-11 10:11:39

  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana Any projects that affect more than one school/department, and/or do not have any budgeted funds allocated for such a system, are identified as major computer systems acquisitions by the Assistant Superintendent of ISS. User managers will send a memo to the Assistant Superintendent of ISS and a copy to the Superintendent. This memo will address the needs for a major computer system acquisition. The memo can originate from one or more user management person(s) or the school/department head. The memo will cover the following issues: A. The District’s area(s) that will be affected by the new system. B. A defined need for the acquisition. C. Estimated costs, savings expected, and the anticipated life span of the proposed system. D. The maximum calendar time allowed for the expected system to be operational. E. A priority ranking will be provided for this project as compared to others under study or development. Analysis of New System Request The Assistant Superintendent of ISS will review the requesting memo. ISS will evaluate the merits of doing a preliminary systems needs study and the status of the total District’s budget situation. ISS will send a reply memo to the requesting manager indicating denial or approval for a feasibility study. If approved, a preliminary systems needs study will be done and the memo will provide the following information: A. When results of the study are to be expected. B. The people and monetary resources provided for the study. C. Identify the user personnel to be contacted. D. What level of confidentiality is expected of the preliminary systems needs study. Feasibility Study An analysis of the users’ area(s) can assist the feasibility study before it is under taken. Gather as much information about the school/department(s) as possible before conducting a formal study. Contact the user personnel identified in the memo received for the assigned project. Examine current procedural documentation. Follow up with a study of the actual procedures followed by the employees of the schools/departments. The operating procedure study should include input and output documents. All existing files will be documented. These include hard copy and computer files. Computer files and their sources will be documented, including the following: A. Data files only on given computers. B. Data files on local area networks. C. Identify the local area network server’s databases. D. Data used from other sources. The current systems operation studied should provide the following information needed for a final systems design to be completed later: A. System flowcharts. B. Dataflow diagrams. C. Document flowcharts. D. Data dictionary. E. Current procedure flowcharts. F. Any work sampling studies done. G. Current operations costs (i.e., direct costs and indirect costs). H. Generated reports and/or computer monitor displays. An evaluation of the proposed system is made for its justification. The feasibility will be determined by several factors:
    2014-11-08 09:11:34

  • Nothando Gumpo United Kingdom As part of the system design process, there may have been the requirement for new equipment (hardware and software) or upgrading of the existing equipment. As part of the planning for the implementation process, this new equipment must be obtained. While this sounds a simple task, it can often be a long and tiresome process. For a large company, upgrading a system may involve replacing hundreds of PCs - and if the hardware is to be upgraded, there may be a number of different parts required for the different models of computers - all of which have to be sourced. Software might need to be purchased "off-the-shelf" then modified or custom-written to suit the specific needs of the system. Depending upon the organisation, there might also be further company or statutory requirements to follow. For example, a Victorian Government Department would not be able to just go out and buy the equipment they need - they would need to conduct a tender. These sorts of requirements may slow the process down. It is very important that this phase of the process is handled properly. This is for a number of reasons - obviously there is the expense of the equipment, but there are also other issues - if there are going to be a hundred new PCs for example, they will need to be stored from the time the company receives them to the time the system is actually implemented. In order to do this the company would have to have available a reasonably large storage facility. If it were a chain of stores that was upgrading their computer system, the new computers would need to be delivered to the appropriate stores as they were ready to be upgraded. In addition, new software would have to be tested for compatibility and to ensure that it was capable of handling the tasks required by the users of the system. This process requires careful planning to ensure the smooth introduction of the new system. In addition to acquiring new equipment, the old equipment must be dealt with as well. It will be necessary to determine the most appropriate course of action for this - disposal, sale or redeployment within the organisation. Either way, there will be company or statutory requirements that will need to be followed that are similar to those that were followed when purchasing equipment. It is important that the acquisition of equipment is timed to allow for the smooth introduction of the new system. Exactly how this will require the delivery of the equipment will vary from system to system, however, careful planning at this point will save significant time and effort later.
    2014-11-05 23:11:10

  • Ralph Webster South Africa As part of the system design process, there may have been the requirement for new equipment (hardware and software) or upgrading of the existing equipment. As part of the planning for the implementation process, this new equipment must be obtained. While this sounds a simple task, it can often be a long and tiresome process. For a large company, upgrading a system may involve replacing hundreds of PCs - and if the hardware is to be upgraded, there may be a number of different parts required for the different models of computers - all of which have to be sourced. Software might need to be purchased "off-the-shelf" then modified or custom-written to suit the specific needs of the system. Depending upon the organisation, there might also be further company or statutory requirements to follow. For example, a Victorian Government Department would not be able to just go out and buy the equipment they need - they would need to conduct a tender. These sorts of requirements may slow the process down. It is very important that this phase of the process is handled properly. This is for a number of reasons - obviously there is the expense of the equipment, but there are also other issues - if there are going to be a hundred new PCs for example, they will need to be stored from the time the company receives them to the time the system is actually implemented. In order to do this the company would have to have available a reasonably large storage facility. If it were a chain of stores that was upgrading their computer system, the new computers would need to be delivered to the appropriate stores as they were ready to be upgraded. In addition, new software would have to be tested for compatibility and to ensure that it was capable of handling the tasks required by the users of the system. This process requires careful planning to ensure the smooth introduction of the new system. In addition to acquiring new equipment, the old equipment must be dealt with as well. It will be necessary to determine the most appropriate course of action for this - disposal, sale or redeployment within the organisation. Either way, there will be company or statutory requirements that will need to be followed that are similar to those that were followed when purchasing equipment. It is important that the acquisition of equipment is timed to allow for the smooth introduction of the new system. Exactly how this will require the delivery of the equipment will vary from system to system, however, careful planning at this point will save significant time and effort later.
    2014-10-20 08:10:47

  • George Fragos Greece old equipment will be stored for a time period?
    2014-10-02 06:10:41

  • Shewangizaw Zenebe Ethiopia Would adjustment of space enable to perform in an effective and efficient manner?
    2014-09-18 12:09:35

  • ANNETTE ROBINSON United States of America Would you need to consider space for the old computers as well or will the space offset when the new ones are replaced?
    2014-09-09 16:09:16

    • Esther Temitope Folorunso Ghana Space planning may be required depending on the size of the old ones.
      2014-09-15 17:09:14
  • Mulalo Nengwenda South Africa what is the best way of dealing with old equipment
    2014-08-20 10:08:38

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan It would be planned whether to disposed or resale.
      2014-08-26 11:08:09
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Support of knowledge work A large proportion of work in an information society involves manipulating abstract information and knowledge, rather than directly processing, manufacturing, or delivering tangible materials. Such work is called knowledge work. Three general categories of information systems support such knowledge work: professional support systems, office information systems, and knowledge management systems. Professional support systems Professional support systems offer the facilities needed to perform tasks specific to a given profession. For example, automotive engineers use computer-aided engineering (CAE) software together with “virtual reality” systems to design and test new models for fuel efficency, handling, and passenger protection before producing prototypes, and later they use CAE in the design and analysis of physical tests. Biochemists use special three-dimensional modeling software to visualize the molecular structure and probable effect of new drugs before investing in lengthy clinical tests. Investment bankers often employ financial software to calculate the expected rewards and potential risks of various investment strategies. Indeed, specialized support systems are now available for most professions. Office information systems The main objectives of office information systems are to facilitate communication and collaboration between the members of an organization and to facilitate them between organizations. Placing an organization's documents and messages in an electronic format—which can be classified, indexed, and stored for easy retrieval—enables individuals to access information on demand. One type of office information system, known as a workflow system, is used to route relevant documents automatically to all appropriate individuals for their contribution. Other types of office information systems handle digital messages in the form of electronic mail, facsimile, and voice mail. Another category of office information systems allows different individuals to work simultaneously on a shared project by using networked computers. Known as groupware, such systems accomplish this by continually sending updated documents—such as business proposals, new designs, or progress reports—to each collaborator's computer. These individuals and their computers need not be located in the same office or even the same building. Groupware is usually deployed over an intranet, a private network that is closed to the general public, and is often accessed by using software originally developed for the Internet. Knowledge management systems Knowledge management systems provide a means to assemble and act on the knowledge accumulated throughout an organization. Such knowledge may include the texts and images contained in patents, design methods, best practices, competitor intelligence, and similar sources. Organizational knowledge is often tacit, rather than explicit, so these systems must also direct users to members of the organization with special expertise. Access to an organization's knowledge is often provided via an intranet equipped with specialized search software. The next section, Management support, describes how information systems are used to assemble reports and reach executive decisions.
    2014-07-20 20:07:45

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Support of knowledge work A large proportion of work in an information society involves manipulating abstract information and knowledge, rather than directly processing, manufacturing, or delivering tangible materials. Such work is called knowledge work. Three general categories of information systems support such knowledge work: professional support systems, office information systems, and knowledge management systems. Professional support systems Professional support systems offer the facilities needed to perform tasks specific to a given profession. For example, automotive engineers use computer-aided engineering (CAE) software together with “virtual reality” systems to design and test new models for fuel efficency, handling, and passenger protection before producing prototypes, and later they use CAE in the design and analysis of physical tests. Biochemists use special three-dimensional modeling software to visualize the molecular structure and probable effect of new drugs before investing in lengthy clinical tests. Investment bankers often employ financial software to calculate the expected rewards and potential risks of various investment strategies. Indeed, specialized support systems are now available for most professions. Office information systems The main objectives of office information systems are to facilitate communication and collaboration between the members of an organization and to facilitate them between organizations. Placing an organization's documents and messages in an electronic format—which can be classified, indexed, and stored for easy retrieval—enables individuals to access information on demand. One type of office information system, known as a workflow system, is used to route relevant documents automatically to all appropriate individuals for their contribution. Other types of office information systems handle digital messages in the form of electronic mail, facsimile, and voice mail. Another category of office information systems allows different individuals to work simultaneously on a shared project by using networked computers. Known as groupware, such systems accomplish this by continually sending updated documents—such as business proposals, new designs, or progress reports—to each collaborator's computer. These individuals and their computers need not be located in the same office or even the same building. Groupware is usually deployed over an intranet, a private network that is closed to the general public, and is often accessed by using software originally developed for the Internet. Knowledge management systems Knowledge management systems provide a means to assemble and act on the knowledge accumulated throughout an organization. Such knowledge may include the texts and images contained in patents, design methods, best practices, competitor intelligence, and similar sources. Organizational knowledge is often tacit, rather than explicit, so these systems must also direct users to members of the organization with special expertise. Access to an organization's knowledge is often provided via an intranet equipped with specialized search software. The next section, Management support, describes how information systems are used to assemble reports and reach executive decisions.
    2014-07-20 20:07:32

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