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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management

Comments about The design phase - The Design Phase: the processing requirements

The comment must be about:
- Module: The design phase
- Topic: The Design Phase: the processing requirements

Latest Comments

  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana The programmer would have identify which areas to be connected and platform of data is to be placed.
    2014-10-20 04:10:53

  • Ralph Webster South Africa he processing requirements of the system are simply the steps the program will need to perform to organise the data collected into the form the final output requires. The programmer needs to identify what manipulation will need to take place, and where in the program it will need to occur. Furthermore, the programmer will need to identify where the steps need to be repeated to reduce the amount of code needed. For example, if the solution involves a database, the programmer will have to know which fields are to be linked and in which tables data is to be stored.
    2014-10-19 10:10:16

  • Ralph Webster South Africa The processing requirements of the system are simply the steps the program will need to perform to organise the data collected into the form the final output requires. The programmer needs to identify what manipulation will need to take place, and where in the program it will need to occur. Furthermore, the programmer will need to identify where the steps need to be repeated to reduce the amount of code needed. For example, if the solution involves a database, the programmer will have to know which fields are to be linked and in which tables data is to be stored.
    2014-10-19 10:10:29

  • Connie Mwema Botswana the programme should identify and analyse the information according to where its suppose to be slotted and do so at once.
    2014-10-06 12:10:19

  • George Fragos Greece who has final decision when reduced the amount?
    2014-10-01 10:10:21

  • Shewangizaw Zenebe Ethiopia The type of data to be organized and filled in the form to get the intended result should be considered at this stage.
    2014-09-17 12:09:59

  • Mulalo Nengwenda South Africa What steps are needed to reduce the amount of code needed
    2014-08-20 09:08:52

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan I dentification of steps that are to be repeated.
      2014-08-26 05:08:54
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Support of knowledge work A large proportion of work in an information society involves manipulating abstract information and knowledge, rather than directly processing, manufacturing, or delivering tangible materials. Such work is called knowledge work. Three general categories of information systems support such knowledge work: professional support systems, office information systems, and knowledge management systems. Professional support systems Professional support systems offer the facilities needed to perform tasks specific to a given profession. For example, automotive engineers use computer-aided engineering (CAE) software together with “virtual reality” systems to design and test new models for fuel efficency, handling, and passenger protection before producing prototypes, and later they use CAE in the design and analysis of physical tests. Biochemists use special three-dimensional modeling software to visualize the molecular structure and probable effect of new drugs before investing in lengthy clinical tests. Investment bankers often employ financial software to calculate the expected rewards and potential risks of various investment strategies. Indeed, specialized support systems are now available for most professions. Office information systems The main objectives of office information systems are to facilitate communication and collaboration between the members of an organization and to facilitate them between organizations. Placing an organization's documents and messages in an electronic format—which can be classified, indexed, and stored for easy retrieval—enables individuals to access information on demand. One type of office information system, known as a workflow system, is used to route relevant documents automatically to all appropriate individuals for their contribution. Other types of office information systems handle digital messages in the form of electronic mail, facsimile, and voice mail. Another category of office information systems allows different individuals to work simultaneously on a shared project by using networked computers. Known as groupware, such systems accomplish this by continually sending updated documents—such as business proposals, new designs, or progress reports—to each collaborator's computer. These individuals and their computers need not be located in the same office or even the same building. Groupware is usually deployed over an intranet, a private network that is closed to the general public, and is often accessed by using software originally developed for the Internet. Knowledge management systems Knowledge management systems provide a means to assemble and act on the knowledge accumulated throughout an organization. Such knowledge may include the texts and images contained in patents, design methods, best practices, competitor intelligence, and similar sources. Organizational knowledge is often tacit, rather than explicit, so these systems must also direct users to members of the organization with special expertise. Access to an organization's knowledge is often provided via an intranet equipped with specialized search software. The next section, Management support, describes how information systems are used to assemble reports and reach executive decisions.
    2014-07-20 20:07:29

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Support of knowledge work A large proportion of work in an information society involves manipulating abstract information and knowledge, rather than directly processing, manufacturing, or delivering tangible materials. Such work is called knowledge work. Three general categories of information systems support such knowledge work: professional support systems, office information systems, and knowledge management systems. Professional support systems Professional support systems offer the facilities needed to perform tasks specific to a given profession. For example, automotive engineers use computer-aided engineering (CAE) software together with “virtual reality” systems to design and test new models for fuel efficency, handling, and passenger protection before producing prototypes, and later they use CAE in the design and analysis of physical tests. Biochemists use special three-dimensional modeling software to visualize the molecular structure and probable effect of new drugs before investing in lengthy clinical tests. Investment bankers often employ financial software to calculate the expected rewards and potential risks of various investment strategies. Indeed, specialized support systems are now available for most professions. Office information systems The main objectives of office information systems are to facilitate communication and collaboration between the members of an organization and to facilitate them between organizations. Placing an organization's documents and messages in an electronic format—which can be classified, indexed, and stored for easy retrieval—enables individuals to access information on demand. One type of office information system, known as a workflow system, is used to route relevant documents automatically to all appropriate individuals for their contribution. Other types of office information systems handle digital messages in the form of electronic mail, facsimile, and voice mail. Another category of office information systems allows different individuals to work simultaneously on a shared project by using networked computers. Known as groupware, such systems accomplish this by continually sending updated documents—such as business proposals, new designs, or progress reports—to each collaborator's computer. These individuals and their computers need not be located in the same office or even the same building. Groupware is usually deployed over an intranet, a private network that is closed to the general public, and is often accessed by using software originally developed for the Internet. Knowledge management systems Knowledge management systems provide a means to assemble and act on the knowledge accumulated throughout an organization. Such knowledge may include the texts and images contained in patents, design methods, best practices, competitor intelligence, and similar sources. Organizational knowledge is often tacit, rather than explicit, so these systems must also direct users to members of the organization with special expertise. Access to an organization's knowledge is often provided via an intranet equipped with specialized search software. The next section, Management support, describes how information systems are used to assemble reports and reach executive decisions.
    2014-07-20 20:07:12

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Support of knowledge work A large proportion of work in an information society involves manipulating abstract information and knowledge, rather than directly processing, manufacturing, or delivering tangible materials. Such work is called knowledge work. Three general categories of information systems support such knowledge work: professional support systems, office information systems, and knowledge management systems. Professional support systems Professional support systems offer the facilities needed to perform tasks specific to a given profession. For example, automotive engineers use computer-aided engineering (CAE) software together with “virtual reality” systems to design and test new models for fuel efficency, handling, and passenger protection before producing prototypes, and later they use CAE in the design and analysis of physical tests. Biochemists use special three-dimensional modeling software to visualize the molecular structure and probable effect of new drugs before investing in lengthy clinical tests. Investment bankers often employ financial software to calculate the expected rewards and potential risks of various investment strategies. Indeed, specialized support systems are now available for most professions. Office information systems The main objectives of office information systems are to facilitate communication and collaboration between the members of an organization and to facilitate them between organizations. Placing an organization's documents and messages in an electronic format—which can be classified, indexed, and stored for easy retrieval—enables individuals to access information on demand. One type of office information system, known as a workflow system, is used to route relevant documents automatically to all appropriate individuals for their contribution. Other types of office information systems handle digital messages in the form of electronic mail, facsimile, and voice mail. Another category of office information systems allows different individuals to work simultaneously on a shared project by using networked computers. Known as groupware, such systems accomplish this by continually sending updated documents—such as business proposals, new designs, or progress reports—to each collaborator's computer. These individuals and their computers need not be located in the same office or even the same building. Groupware is usually deployed over an intranet, a private network that is closed to the general public, and is often accessed by using software originally developed for the Internet. Knowledge management systems Knowledge management systems provide a means to assemble and act on the knowledge accumulated throughout an organization. Such knowledge may include the texts and images contained in patents, design methods, best practices, competitor intelligence, and similar sources. Organizational knowledge is often tacit, rather than explicit, so these systems must also direct users to members of the organization with special expertise. Access to an organization's knowledge is often provided via an intranet equipped with specialized search software. The next section, Management support, describes how information systems are used to assemble reports and reach executive decisions.
    2014-07-20 20:07:01

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Support of knowledge work A large proportion of work in an information society involves manipulating abstract information and knowledge, rather than directly processing, manufacturing, or delivering tangible materials. Such work is called knowledge work. Three general categories of information systems support such knowledge work: professional support systems, office information systems, and knowledge management systems. Professional support systems Professional support systems offer the facilities needed to perform tasks specific to a given profession. For example, automotive engineers use computer-aided engineering (CAE) software together with “virtual reality” systems to design and test new models for fuel efficency, handling, and passenger protection before producing prototypes, and later they use CAE in the design and analysis of physical tests. Biochemists use special three-dimensional modeling software to visualize the molecular structure and probable effect of new drugs before investing in lengthy clinical tests. Investment bankers often employ financial software to calculate the expected rewards and potential risks of various investment strategies. Indeed, specialized support systems are now available for most professions. Office information systems The main objectives of office information systems are to facilitate communication and collaboration between the members of an organization and to facilitate them between organizations. Placing an organization's documents and messages in an electronic format—which can be classified, indexed, and stored for easy retrieval—enables individuals to access information on demand. One type of office information system, known as a workflow system, is used to route relevant documents automatically to all appropriate individuals for their contribution. Other types of office information systems handle digital messages in the form of electronic mail, facsimile, and voice mail. Another category of office information systems allows different individuals to work simultaneously on a shared project by using networked computers. Known as groupware, such systems accomplish this by continually sending updated documents—such as business proposals, new designs, or progress reports—to each collaborator's computer. These individuals and their computers need not be located in the same office or even the same building. Groupware is usually deployed over an intranet, a private network that is closed to the general public, and is often accessed by using software originally developed for the Internet. Knowledge management systems Knowledge management systems provide a means to assemble and act on the knowledge accumulated throughout an organization. Such knowledge may include the texts and images contained in patents, design methods, best practices, competitor intelligence, and similar sources. Organizational knowledge is often tacit, rather than explicit, so these systems must also direct users to members of the organization with special expertise. Access to an organization's knowledge is often provided via an intranet equipped with specialized search software. The next section, Management support, describes how information systems are used to assemble reports and reach executive decisions.
    2014-07-20 20:07:49

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Support of knowledge work A large proportion of work in an information society involves manipulating abstract information and knowledge, rather than directly processing, manufacturing, or delivering tangible materials. Such work is called knowledge work. Three general categories of information systems support such knowledge work: professional support systems, office information systems, and knowledge management systems. Professional support systems Professional support systems offer the facilities needed to perform tasks specific to a given profession. For example, automotive engineers use computer-aided engineering (CAE) software together with “virtual reality” systems to design and test new models for fuel efficency, handling, and passenger protection before producing prototypes, and later they use CAE in the design and analysis of physical tests. Biochemists use special three-dimensional modeling software to visualize the molecular structure and probable effect of new drugs before investing in lengthy clinical tests. Investment bankers often employ financial software to calculate the expected rewards and potential risks of various investment strategies. Indeed, specialized support systems are now available for most professions. Office information systems The main objectives of office information systems are to facilitate communication and collaboration between the members of an organization and to facilitate them between organizations. Placing an organization's documents and messages in an electronic format—which can be classified, indexed, and stored for easy retrieval—enables individuals to access information on demand. One type of office information system, known as a workflow system, is used to route relevant documents automatically to all appropriate individuals for their contribution. Other types of office information systems handle digital messages in the form of electronic mail, facsimile, and voice mail. Another category of office information systems allows different individuals to work simultaneously on a shared project by using networked computers. Known as groupware, such systems accomplish this by continually sending updated documents—such as business proposals, new designs, or progress reports—to each collaborator's computer. These individuals and their computers need not be located in the same office or even the same building. Groupware is usually deployed over an intranet, a private network that is closed to the general public, and is often accessed by using software originally developed for the Internet. Knowledge management systems Knowledge management systems provide a means to assemble and act on the knowledge accumulated throughout an organization. Such knowledge may include the texts and images contained in patents, design methods, best practices, competitor intelligence, and similar sources. Organizational knowledge is often tacit, rather than explicit, so these systems must also direct users to members of the organization with special expertise. Access to an organization's knowledge is often provided via an intranet equipped with specialized search software. The next section, Management support, describes how information systems are used to assemble reports and reach executive decisions.
    2014-07-20 20:07:36

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Support of knowledge work A large proportion of work in an information society involves manipulating abstract information and knowledge, rather than directly processing, manufacturing, or delivering tangible materials. Such work is called knowledge work. Three general categories of information systems support such knowledge work: professional support systems, office information systems, and knowledge management systems. Professional support systems Professional support systems offer the facilities needed to perform tasks specific to a given profession. For example, automotive engineers use computer-aided engineering (CAE) software together with “virtual reality” systems to design and test new models for fuel efficency, handling, and passenger protection before producing prototypes, and later they use CAE in the design and analysis of physical tests. Biochemists use special three-dimensional modeling software to visualize the molecular structure and probable effect of new drugs before investing in lengthy clinical tests. Investment bankers often employ financial software to calculate the expected rewards and potential risks of various investment strategies. Indeed, specialized support systems are now available for most professions. Office information systems The main objectives of office information systems are to facilitate communication and collaboration between the members of an organization and to facilitate them between organizations. Placing an organization's documents and messages in an electronic format—which can be classified, indexed, and stored for easy retrieval—enables individuals to access information on demand. One type of office information system, known as a workflow system, is used to route relevant documents automatically to all appropriate individuals for their contribution. Other types of office information systems handle digital messages in the form of electronic mail, facsimile, and voice mail. Another category of office information systems allows different individuals to work simultaneously on a shared project by using networked computers. Known as groupware, such systems accomplish this by continually sending updated documents—such as business proposals, new designs, or progress reports—to each collaborator's computer. These individuals and their computers need not be located in the same office or even the same building. Groupware is usually deployed over an intranet, a private network that is closed to the general public, and is often accessed by using software originally developed for the Internet. Knowledge management systems Knowledge management systems provide a means to assemble and act on the knowledge accumulated throughout an organization. Such knowledge may include the texts and images contained in patents, design methods, best practices, competitor intelligence, and similar sources. Organizational knowledge is often tacit, rather than explicit, so these systems must also direct users to members of the organization with special expertise. Access to an organization's knowledge is often provided via an intranet equipped with specialized search software. The next section, Management support, describes how information systems are used to assemble reports and reach executive decisions.
    2014-07-20 20:07:16

  • ToeToe Aung Singapore What are the steps need to perform by programmers or analyst when designing the processing requirements? Only one step to perform the data collected into the form the final output requires?
    2014-06-29 08:06:16

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Many steps.
      2014-08-26 05:08:20
  • Satu Korhonen Finland What are processing requirements?
    2014-06-26 17:06:28

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Those that resulted in to desired outputs.
      2014-08-26 05:08:35
    • Daniel Chol Koknyin South Sudan The collection of data, identification of manipulations taking place and know where the program occur.
      2014-07-05 21:07:11
  • Reza Abbasi Iran what is The programmer needs ?
    2014-06-22 15:06:54

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Collection of adequate data and identification of manipulations that would take place in order to process required outputs.
      2014-08-26 05:08:08
  • Reza Abbasi Iran what is The programmer needs ?
    2014-06-20 01:06:36

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan The same like anwered above.
      2014-08-26 05:08:31
  • Fitzroy Hugh Fagan Jamaica Give an example as to why process requirements are important?
    2014-06-19 18:06:04

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan It leads to the chievement prpcess requirement output.
      2014-08-26 05:08:26
    • Reza Abbasi Iran For example, if the solution involves a database, the programmer will have to know which fields are to be linked and in which tables data is to be stored.
      2014-06-20 01:06:50
  • Annette Weizbauer Germany Why do programmers need to identify what manipulation will need to take place?
    2014-06-16 15:06:58

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan In order to assess the process requirement output for the project.
      2014-08-26 05:08:37
    • Reza Abbasi Iran The programmer needs to identify what manipulation will need to take place, and where in the program it will need to occur. Furthermore, the programmer will need to identify where the steps need to be repeated to reduce the amount of code needed. For example, if the solution involves a database, the programmer will have to know which fields are to be linked and in which tables data is to be stored.
      2014-06-20 01:06:13
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