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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management


Comments about The design phase - The Design Phase: factors to be considered when designing the input Requirements

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- Module: The design phase
- Topic: The Design Phase: factors to be considered when designing the input Requirements

Latest Comments

  • Thomas Ndungo Lekunze Cameroon At this stage data is collected from the different sources into a pool in a programmed maner to avoid dublicity an errors and later screened to retain only that wich is relevant to the production of inputs for the sysytem.
    2014-12-17 12:12:07

  • Thomas Ndungo Lekunze Cameroon Data collection ,analysis and streamlining in alignment to the information require to put in place the respective inputs for the entire system is premodial at this level.
    2014-12-16 11:12:33

  • Stephen Diya Nigeria Very clear
    2014-12-13 15:12:00

  • Caroline Omoro Kenya is it possible to limit the user choice to pre determined choices?
    2014-11-26 11:11:52

  • Caroline Omoro Kenya in order to establish what data is needed to obtain required output, the input design is important fot the computer.Therefore Garbage In Garbage Out should be observed.The number of techniques to ensure data collected must be of best quality that will ensure no wrong data is entered.when designing input the programmer should identify the following; -duplicate data -methods of reducing input errors -data validation checks and -input screen method/design
    2014-11-26 11:11:29

  • Zinabie Tadesse Gebremedhin Ethiopia There are a number of techniques that a good programmer will use to ensure that the data they collect is of the best quality possible. They will limit the opportunities for the user to enter the wrong data, and will ensure the user does not have to enter data twice. 1 Identify methods of reducing input errors 2 Identify data validation checks 3.Input screen/method design
    2014-11-26 10:11:37

  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya well understood
    2014-11-17 12:11:30

  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya The design of the input is vital to the successful creation of a computer system
    2014-11-17 12:11:09

  • Janvier Nyandamu Rwanda GIGO (Garbage in, Garbage out) a common terms to describe data entry.
    2014-11-11 09:11:52

  • Janvier Nyandamu Rwanda well, understood
    2014-11-10 17:11:05

  • Nothando Gumpo United Kingdom Having established what the system needs to produce to meet its goals, the next area of interest is establishing what data needs to be obtained to produce that output. The design of the input is vital to the successful creation of a computer system. Put simply, the input must be collected from the various sources with a minimal amount of errors, and with the greatest possible speed. A common term used to describe data entry is GIGO - garbage in, garbage out. This expression highlights the importance of input design to the quality of the program produced. The final output will only be as accurate as the data put into the system - and the quality of that data will be partly determined by the quality of the design of the collection methods. There are a number of techniques that a good programmer will use to ensure that the data they collect is of the best quality possible. They will limit the opportunities for the user to enter the wrong data, and will ensure the user does not have to enter data twice. When designing input, the programmer should: Identify duplicate data - Efficient program design requires that the program only collect and store each data element once. Programmers should analyse the data requirements and identify where data is used more than once and ensure it is collected just once. It is important to do this - while it may be easier to collect data more than once, rather than create highly complex data structures, this approach compromises the integrity of the information produced, as it allows for more input errors and the creation of conflicting outputs. Identify methods of reducing input errors - When collecting data, the programmer should make use of as many of the features available to ensure that the data being collected is as free from errors as possible. This can be achieved through the use of features like drop down boxes, radio buttons, check boxes etc. that limit the user to selecting from pre-defined "correct" options. By carefully constructing input screens, it is possible to limit the number of areas the users can enter invalid data. Identify data validation checks - While it is possible to limit the users choices to pre-defined choices, it may not always be possible or practical to do so. An example would be postcodes.
    2014-11-06 00:11:05

  • Assel Satpayeva Kazakhstan It is required to: 1) Identify duplicate data 2) Identify methods of reducing input errors 3) Identify data validation checks 4) Input screen/method design
    2014-10-29 05:10:45

  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana The GIGO is essential to produce space upon the system unwanted data and files i guess.
    2014-10-20 04:10:52

  • Ralph Webster South Africa Having established what the system needs to produce to meet its goals, the next area of interest is establishing what data needs to be obtained to produce that output. The design of the input is vital to the successful creation of a computer system. Put simply, the input must be collected from the various sources with a minimal amount of errors, and with the greatest possible speed. A common term used to describe data entry is GIGO - garbage in, garbage out. This expression highlights the importance of input design to the quality of the program produced. The final output will only be as accurate as the data put into the system - and the quality of that data will be partly determined by the quality of the design of the collection methods. There are a number of techniques that a good programmer will use to ensure that the data they collect is of the best quality possible. They will limit the opportunities for the user to enter the wrong data, and will ensure the user does not have to enter data twice. When designing input, the programmer should: Identify duplicate data - Efficient program design requires that the program only collect and store each data element once. Programmers should analyse the data requirements and identify where data is used more than once and ensure it is collected just once. It is important to do this - while it may be easier to collect data more than once, rather than create highly complex data structures, this approach compromises the integrity of the information produced, as it allows for more input errors and the creation of conflicting outputs. Identify methods of reducing input errors - When collecting data, the programmer should make use of as many of the features available to ensure that the data being collected is as free from errors as possible. This can be achieved through the use of features like drop down boxes, radio buttons, check boxes etc. that limit the user to selecting from pre-defined "correct" options. By carefully constructing input screens, it is possible to limit the number of areas the users can enter invalid data. Identify data validation checks - While it is possible to limit the users choices to pre-defined choices, it may not always be possible or practical to do so. An example would be postcodes. While all postcodes are pre-defined, there are so many of them it would not be possible to list them all on a screen, so another method must be employed to make sure the data is accurate. Writing code to check the data is accurate can do this. For example, the postcodes could be checked to see if they fall within the expected range for the state given. While this relies on the user to input correct data, it does reduce the amount of incorrect data the system collects. Input screen/method design - Thought needs to be given to the actual design of the input collection screens or methods. Care needs to be taken to ensure the screens that collect the data are arranged in an attractive and logical manner. If data is to be entered from a form, then the data collection screens should follow the general format of those screens to make data entry easier, and therefore less prone to errors.
    2014-10-19 10:10:26

  • George Fragos Greece GIGO is a terminology in Project Management?
    2014-10-01 10:10:23

  • Segedin Dragan United Arab Emirates I wonder if any realistic example of a GIGO (garbage in, garbage out) can be provided (as the best explaination of the impact of having a good collection method)?
    2014-09-28 08:09:05

  • Stephen Waiswa Uganda In Scenarios where the Input Requirements are not sufficient , Should one proceed with the Design piece of product for example
    2014-09-17 12:09:15

  • Shewangizaw Zenebe Ethiopia The capacity of the organization in terms of having skilled and qualified staffs and the availability of cash to run can be asked at this stage
    2014-09-17 12:09:32

  • ANNETTE ROBINSON United States of America Does the Project Manager program or follow up on each step as the project progress?
    2014-09-09 13:09:35

    • Thabo Ishmael Lejone Lesotho follow up on the project progress,,unless you're also a programmer
      2014-09-24 14:09:59
  • Mulalo Nengwenda South Africa which collection methods are commonly used and that gives a good outcome/output
    2014-08-20 09:08:22

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan The correct input date which free from bias.
      2014-08-25 18:08:19
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