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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management


Comments about The planning phase - The planning phase - feasibility studies

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- Module: The planning phase
- Topic: The planning phase - feasibility studies
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Latest Comments

  • Srikant Parasar India Yes and it will be great in planing.
    2015-01-28 14:01:41

  • Festus Odim Qatar Conducting a feasibility study helps to know if a project is worthwhile
    2015-01-20 14:01:21

  • Veronica Brown Australia The main reason for conducting a feasibility study is to know if the cost of developing the system be justified by the benefits the system will deliver.
    2015-01-12 09:01:05

    • olukan olusola Nigeria Agree with you.
      2015-01-16 11:01:12
  • Afaf Atta Ibraheem Egypt Worthwhile vary from system to system and company to company
    2015-01-11 10:01:12

  • Kester Saturday Nigeria The main reason for conducting a feasibility study is to know if the cost of developing the system be justified by the benefits the system will deliver
    2015-01-10 09:01:27

  • Alexander Seruzi Uganda further questions need to be asked
    2015-01-07 11:01:03

  • Ray Haskins United States of America This gets down to the science of things in a sense. Somewhat like the compare & contrasts method
    2015-01-06 09:01:45

  • Bonolo Tlale Botswana Feasibility studies are very important for decision making in any organisation most especially when it has to do with putting into place of major projects
    2014-12-30 13:12:36

  • Franklin King Liberia Once the problem identification process has been completed and an idea of a solution (or a number of possible solutions) have been established, but before any large project is approved, a thorough investigation of the implications, costs and benefits of the system should be undertaken. This investigation is referred to as the Feasibility Study. The main reason for conducting a feasibility study, in broad terms, is to see if creating the system will be worthwhile. What defines "worthwhile" will vary from company to company and system to system. Generally speaking, it is a balancing act - can the cost of developing the system be justified by the benefits the system will deliver?
    2014-12-18 17:12:12

  • Thomas Ndungo Lekunze Cameroon Feasibility studies are very fundamental for decision making in any organisation most especially when it has to do with putting into place of major projects.
    2014-12-15 08:12:24

  • Stephen Diya Nigeria Yes and it will be great in planing
    2014-12-11 14:12:34

  • ESSOTOLOME BODJO China The issues that a feasibility study will look at include: •can the system be created? •does the company have the ability to create the system? •if the system was developed, does the company have the ability to keep it operating at an acceptable level? •can the system development costs and ongoing costs be justified on the improvements it will deliver? •is there a better way of solving the problem? •should the system development go ahead?
    2014-12-02 15:12:05

  • Aggrey Kegome Kenya This study will include ability ,sustenance,justification,improved solution ways and approval.
    2014-12-02 09:12:58

  • Zinabie Tadesse Gebremedhin Ethiopia Once the problem identification process has been completed and an idea of a solution (or a number of possible solutions) have been established, but before any large project is approved, a thorough investigation of the implications, costs and benefits of the system should be undertaken. This investigation is referred to as the Feasibility Study. The main reason for conducting a feasibility study, in broad terms, is to see if creating the system will be worthwhile. What defines "worthwhile" will vary from company to company and system to system. Generally speaking, it is a balancing act
    2014-11-25 11:11:33

  • Md Shohel Mahmud Bangladesh before implementing a process a thorough investigation of the implications, costs and benefits of the system should be undertaken and this is Feasibility Study.
    2014-11-17 04:11:41

  • Caroline Omoro Kenya what happens if the feasibility study phase is altered or done away with?what are the repercussions?
    2014-11-16 09:11:40

  • Caroline Omoro Kenya The main reason for feasibility study is to ensure that the system is worthwhile.different systems have different measures but the following cut across. -can the system be created and does the company have the machinery to create the system -can the system development costs and organizational costs be justified on the improvements it will show -is there a better way of solving the problem and -should the system development continue
    2014-11-16 09:11:18

  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya Once the problem identification process has been completed and an idea of a solution (or a number of possible solutions) have been established, but before any large project is approved, a thorough investigation of the implications, costs and benefits of the system should be undertaken. This investigation is referred to as the Feasibility Study.
    2014-11-16 06:11:27

  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya Once the problem identification process has been completed and an idea of a solution (or a number of possible solutions) have been established, but before any large project is approved, a thorough investigation of the implications, costs and benefits of the system should be undertaken. This investigation is referred to as the Feasibility Study. The main reason for conducting a feasibility study, in broad terms, is to see if creating the system will be worthwhile. What defines "worthwhile" will vary from company to company and system to system. Generally speaking, it is a balancing act - can the cost of developing the system be justified by the benefits the system will deliver? The issues that a feasibility study will look at include: can the system be created? does the company have the ability to create the system? if the system was developed, does the company have the ability to keep it operating at an acceptable level? can the system development costs and ongoing costs be justified on the improvements it will deliver? is there a better way of solving the problem? should the system development go ahead?
    2014-11-16 06:11:31

    • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya Once the problem identification process has been completed and an idea of a solution (or a number of possible solutions) have been established, but before any large project is approved, a thorough investigation of the implications, costs and benefits of the system should be undertaken. This investigation is referred to as the Feasibility Study. The main reason for conducting a feasibility study, in broad terms, is to see if creating the system will be worthwhile. What defines "worthwhile" will vary from company to company and system to system. Generally speaking, it is a balancing act - can the cost of developing the system be justified by the benefits the system will deliver? The issues that a feasibility study will look at include: can the system be created? does the company have the ability to create the system? if the system was developed, does the company have the ability to keep it operating at an acceptable level? can the system development costs and ongoing costs be justified on the improvements it will deliver? is there a better way of solving the problem? should the system development go ahead?
      2014-11-16 06:11:44
  • Nothando Gumpo United Kingdom Once the problem identification process has been completed and an idea of a solution (or a number of possible solutions) have been established, but before any large project is approved, a thorough investigation of the implications, costs and benefits of the system should be undertaken. This investigation is referred to as the Feasibility Study. The main reason for conducting a feasibility study, in broad terms, is to see if creating the system will be worthwhile. What defines "worthwhile" will vary from company to company and system to system. Generally speaking, it is a balancing act - can the cost of developing the system be justified by the benefits the system will deliver? The issues that a feasibility study will look at include; 1. can the system be created? 2. does the company have the ability to create the system? 3. if the system was developed, does the company have the ability to keep it operating at an level? 4. can the system development costs and ongoing costs be justified on the improvements it will deliver? 5. is there a better way of solving the problem? 6. should the system development go ahead?
    2014-11-06 12:11:16

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