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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management

Questions & Answers about The planning phase - Feasibility study question 6

The Question must be about:
- Module: The planning phase
- Topic: Feasibility study question 6

Latest Questions

  • ANNETTE ROBINSON United States of America What's the difference if you proceed with the system or proceed an altered the system? Both seems to proceed with the system.
    2014-09-09 12:09:07

  • Philip Pam Nigeria What if there is a tie in the proposal consideration?
    2014-08-17 16:08:46

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Then the alternative way has to be suggested and review before its approval.
      2014-08-25 16:08:25
  • Philip Pam Nigeria I think this covers everything
    2014-08-15 21:08:11

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Are sure? just give some highlight.
      2014-08-25 16:08:23
  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana Can proceeding to the initial plan make any change to the system?
    2014-08-14 23:08:34

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes if the system requres so.
      2014-08-25 16:08:56
    • Philip Pam Nigeria yes, that is by little alteration to the original plan
      2014-08-15 21:08:55
  • Alexander Njoku Nigeria How to proceed with the system initial plan?
    2014-08-06 10:08:47

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan It is when the feasiblity study proves it right.
      2014-08-25 16:08:49
  • Vikram Vasant Rotkar United Kingdom How to do alteration in the initial plan?
    2014-07-21 18:07:31

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan After feasiblity study and it has been found that the initial plan is not working well.
      2014-08-25 16:08:40
    • Philip Pam Nigeria Either adding or removing any thing from the original plan
      2014-08-15 22:08:25
    • Glyn Chapman United Kingdom This could be anything that deviates from the original plan for instance an increase or reduction in budget, new hardware, new staff, new objectives etc.
      2014-07-21 20:07:16
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Management support Management reporting systems A large category of information systems comprises those designed to support the management of an organization. Those systems rely on data obtained by transaction processing systems, as well as data acquired outside the organization (such as business intelligence gleaned on the Internet) and data provided by business partners, suppliers, and customers. Information systems support all levels of management, from those in charge of short-term schedules and budgets for small work groups to those concerned with long-term plans and budgets for the entire organization. Management reporting systems provide routine, detailed, and voluminous information reports specific to each manager's areas of responsibility. Generally, these reports focus on past and present performance, rather than projecting future performance. To prevent information overload, reports are automatically sent only under exceptional circumstances or at the specific request of a manager. Decision support systems All information systems support decision making, however indirectly, but decision support systems are expressly designed for this purpose. The two principal varieties of decision support systems are model-driven and data-driven. In a model-driven decision support system, a preprogrammed model is applied to a limited data set, such as a sales database for the present quarter. During a typical session, an analyst or sales manager will conduct a dialog with this decision support system by specifying a number of “what-if” scenarios. For example, in order to establish a selling price for a new product, the sales manager may use a marketing decision support system. Such a system contains a preprogrammed model relating various factors—the price of the product, the cost of goods, and the promotion expense—to the projected sales volume over the first five years on the market. By supplying different product prices to the model, the manager can compare predicted results and select the most profitable selling price. The primary objective of data-driven decision support systems is to analyze large pools of data, accumulated over long periods of time in “data warehouses,” in a process known as data mining. Data mining searches for significant patterns, such as sequences (buying a new house, followed by a new dinner table) and clusters (large families and van sales), with which decisions can be made. Data-driven decision support systems include a variety of statistical models and rely on various artificial intelligence techniques, such as expert systems, neural networks, and intelligent agents. An important category of decision support systems enables a group of decision makers to work together without necessarily being in the same place at the same time. These group decision systems include software tools for brainstorming and reaching consensus. Another category, geographic information systems, can help analyze and display data by using digitized maps. By looking at a geographic distribution of mortgage loans, for example, one can easily establish a pattern of discrimination. Executive information systems Executive information systems make a variety of critical information readily available in a highly summarized and convenient form. Senior managers characteristically employ many informal sources of information, however, so that formal, computerized information systems are of limited assistance. Nevertheless, this assistance is important for the chief executive officer, senior and executive vice presidents, and the board of directors to monitor the performance of the company, assess the business environment, and develop strategic directions for the future. In particular, these executives need to compare their organization's performance with that of its competitors and investigate general economic trends in regions or countries for potential expansion. Often relying on multiple media, executive information systems give their users an opportunity to “drill down” from summary data to increasingly detailed and focused information.
    2014-07-20 20:07:15

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Management support Management reporting systems A large category of information systems comprises those designed to support the management of an organization. Those systems rely on data obtained by transaction processing systems, as well as data acquired outside the organization (such as business intelligence gleaned on the Internet) and data provided by business partners, suppliers, and customers. Information systems support all levels of management, from those in charge of short-term schedules and budgets for small work groups to those concerned with long-term plans and budgets for the entire organization. Management reporting systems provide routine, detailed, and voluminous information reports specific to each manager's areas of responsibility. Generally, these reports focus on past and present performance, rather than projecting future performance. To prevent information overload, reports are automatically sent only under exceptional circumstances or at the specific request of a manager. Decision support systems All information systems support decision making, however indirectly, but decision support systems are expressly designed for this purpose. The two principal varieties of decision support systems are model-driven and data-driven. In a model-driven decision support system, a preprogrammed model is applied to a limited data set, such as a sales database for the present quarter. During a typical session, an analyst or sales manager will conduct a dialog with this decision support system by specifying a number of “what-if” scenarios. For example, in order to establish a selling price for a new product, the sales manager may use a marketing decision support system. Such a system contains a preprogrammed model relating various factors—the price of the product, the cost of goods, and the promotion expense—to the projected sales volume over the first five years on the market. By supplying different product prices to the model, the manager can compare predicted results and select the most profitable selling price. The primary objective of data-driven decision support systems is to analyze large pools of data, accumulated over long periods of time in “data warehouses,” in a process known as data mining. Data mining searches for significant patterns, such as sequences (buying a new house, followed by a new dinner table) and clusters (large families and van sales), with which decisions can be made. Data-driven decision support systems include a variety of statistical models and rely on various artificial intelligence techniques, such as expert systems, neural networks, and intelligent agents. An important category of decision support systems enables a group of decision makers to work together without necessarily being in the same place at the same time. These group decision systems include software tools for brainstorming and reaching consensus. Another category, geographic information systems, can help analyze and display data by using digitized maps. By looking at a geographic distribution of mortgage loans, for example, one can easily establish a pattern of discrimination. Executive information systems Executive information systems make a variety of critical information readily available in a highly summarized and convenient form. Senior managers characteristically employ many informal sources of information, however, so that formal, computerized information systems are of limited assistance. Nevertheless, this assistance is important for the chief executive officer, senior and executive vice presidents, and the board of directors to monitor the performance of the company, assess the business environment, and develop strategic directions for the future. In particular, these executives need to compare their organization's performance with that of its competitors and investigate general economic trends in regions or countries for potential expansion. Often relying on multiple media, executive information systems give their users an opportunity to “drill down” from summary data to increasingly detailed and focused information.
    2014-07-20 20:07:42

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Management support Management reporting systems A large category of information systems comprises those designed to support the management of an organization. Those systems rely on data obtained by transaction processing systems, as well as data acquired outside the organization (such as business intelligence gleaned on the Internet) and data provided by business partners, suppliers, and customers. Information systems support all levels of management, from those in charge of short-term schedules and budgets for small work groups to those concerned with long-term plans and budgets for the entire organization. Management reporting systems provide routine, detailed, and voluminous information reports specific to each manager's areas of responsibility. Generally, these reports focus on past and present performance, rather than projecting future performance. To prevent information overload, reports are automatically sent only under exceptional circumstances or at the specific request of a manager. Decision support systems All information systems support decision making, however indirectly, but decision support systems are expressly designed for this purpose. The two principal varieties of decision support systems are model-driven and data-driven. In a model-driven decision support system, a preprogrammed model is applied to a limited data set, such as a sales database for the present quarter. During a typical session, an analyst or sales manager will conduct a dialog with this decision support system by specifying a number of “what-if” scenarios. For example, in order to establish a selling price for a new product, the sales manager may use a marketing decision support system. Such a system contains a preprogrammed model relating various factors—the price of the product, the cost of goods, and the promotion expense—to the projected sales volume over the first five years on the market. By supplying different product prices to the model, the manager can compare predicted results and select the most profitable selling price. The primary objective of data-driven decision support systems is to analyze large pools of data, accumulated over long periods of time in “data warehouses,” in a process known as data mining. Data mining searches for significant patterns, such as sequences (buying a new house, followed by a new dinner table) and clusters (large families and van sales), with which decisions can be made. Data-driven decision support systems include a variety of statistical models and rely on various artificial intelligence techniques, such as expert systems, neural networks, and intelligent agents. An important category of decision support systems enables a group of decision makers to work together without necessarily being in the same place at the same time. These group decision systems include software tools for brainstorming and reaching consensus. Another category, geographic information systems, can help analyze and display data by using digitized maps. By looking at a geographic distribution of mortgage loans, for example, one can easily establish a pattern of discrimination. Executive information systems Executive information systems make a variety of critical information readily available in a highly summarized and convenient form. Senior managers characteristically employ many informal sources of information, however, so that formal, computerized information systems are of limited assistance. Nevertheless, this assistance is important for the chief executive officer, senior and executive vice presidents, and the board of directors to monitor the performance of the company, assess the business environment, and develop strategic directions for the future. In particular, these executives need to compare their organization's performance with that of its competitors and investigate general economic trends in regions or countries for potential expansion. Often relying on multiple media, executive information systems give their users an opportunity to “drill down” from summary data to increasingly detailed and focused information.
    2014-07-20 20:07:40

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Management support Management reporting systems A large category of information systems comprises those designed to support the management of an organization. Those systems rely on data obtained by transaction processing systems, as well as data acquired outside the organization (such as business intelligence gleaned on the Internet) and data provided by business partners, suppliers, and customers. Information systems support all levels of management, from those in charge of short-term schedules and budgets for small work groups to those concerned with long-term plans and budgets for the entire organization. Management reporting systems provide routine, detailed, and voluminous information reports specific to each manager's areas of responsibility. Generally, these reports focus on past and present performance, rather than projecting future performance. To prevent information overload, reports are automatically sent only under exceptional circumstances or at the specific request of a manager. Decision support systems All information systems support decision making, however indirectly, but decision support systems are expressly designed for this purpose. The two principal varieties of decision support systems are model-driven and data-driven. In a model-driven decision support system, a preprogrammed model is applied to a limited data set, such as a sales database for the present quarter. During a typical session, an analyst or sales manager will conduct a dialog with this decision support system by specifying a number of “what-if” scenarios. For example, in order to establish a selling price for a new product, the sales manager may use a marketing decision support system. Such a system contains a preprogrammed model relating various factors—the price of the product, the cost of goods, and the promotion expense—to the projected sales volume over the first five years on the market. By supplying different product prices to the model, the manager can compare predicted results and select the most profitable selling price. The primary objective of data-driven decision support systems is to analyze large pools of data, accumulated over long periods of time in “data warehouses,” in a process known as data mining. Data mining searches for significant patterns, such as sequences (buying a new house, followed by a new dinner table) and clusters (large families and van sales), with which decisions can be made. Data-driven decision support systems include a variety of statistical models and rely on various artificial intelligence techniques, such as expert systems, neural networks, and intelligent agents. An important category of decision support systems enables a group of decision makers to work together without necessarily being in the same place at the same time. These group decision systems include software tools for brainstorming and reaching consensus. Another category, geographic information systems, can help analyze and display data by using digitized maps. By looking at a geographic distribution of mortgage loans, for example, one can easily establish a pattern of discrimination. Executive information systems Executive information systems make a variety of critical information readily available in a highly summarized and convenient form. Senior managers characteristically employ many informal sources of information, however, so that formal, computerized information systems are of limited assistance. Nevertheless, this assistance is important for the chief executive officer, senior and executive vice presidents, and the board of directors to monitor the performance of the company, assess the business environment, and develop strategic directions for the future. In particular, these executives need to compare their organization's performance with that of its competitors and investigate general economic trends in regions or countries for potential expansion. Often relying on multiple media, executive information systems give their users an opportunity to “drill down” from summary data to increasingly detailed and focused information.
    2014-07-20 20:07:26

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 19:07:34

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 19:07:20

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 19:07:00

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 19:07:41

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 19:07:30

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 19:07:16

  • ToeToe Aung Singapore What is the processes of the proceeding the systems after stopping the development for a while with some reasons?
    2014-06-27 06:06:17

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Whether to go on with initial plans ot altered it abit or leave it for good.
      2014-08-25 16:08:36
    • Kyaw Ko Ko Lwin Singapore E.g the project is on hold due to business users are analyzing on their requirement. That time cannot proceed the development. Normally it could not be effected to production since it is in development.
      2014-07-08 15:07:02
    • Daniel Chol Koknyin South Sudan By using three categories i e, proceed with system as planned or with some alternations.
      2014-07-04 21:07:11
  • Reza Abbasi Iran What are the three categories of recommendation?
    2014-06-22 16:06:18

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan To go on with initial plan, to alteration or stop it.
      2014-08-25 16:08:35
  • Reza Abbasi Iran What are the three categories of recommendation?
    2014-06-22 16:06:18

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Why do you repeat the smae quest sir?
      2014-08-25 16:08:09
    • Satu Korhonen Finland Go ahead as planned, go ahead with alterations, do not go ahead but seek other options
      2014-06-25 15:06:31
  • Omar Akram Pakistan an system be handover to next party, if already signed contact fail to flourish?
    2014-06-17 02:06:09

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan No I don't think so.
      2014-08-25 16:08:52
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