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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management

Comments about The planning phase - Feasibility study question 5

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- Module: The planning phase
- Topic: Feasibility study question 5

Latest Comments

  • Ralph Webster South Africa Having established what the proposed system will deliver and at what cost, the next step in the feasibility study is to review this material against other possible solutions. At this point, it may become clear there are better ways of achieving the desired outcomes - this may be because the system cannot deliver all of the required objectives, or enabling the system to do so would cost far more than can be justified. By revisiting other options, the company ensures the system which is finally approved is one which provides the best system for the money which is spent on it.
    2014-10-19 08:10:54

  • George Ugim Nigeria During these period of investigating better, cheaper and most cost effective means of solving problems, will this not contribute to the planning phase of a specific project?
    2014-10-12 19:10:09

  • Linda Manzano United States of America Company must to search for data in order to have question .. that way they can fin the root cause of any essue that my occurred in the future with this project.
    2014-10-09 04:10:51

  • George Fragos Greece which other options revisiting a company?
    2014-09-29 10:09:07

  • ANNETTE ROBINSON United States of America Shouldn't this step be included in the investigation area?
    2014-09-09 01:09:01

    • lyatuu oscar Tanzania Yes it is. thus way we have say feasibility study through that you can be able to investigate whether 'there a better way of solving the problem" then from those ways you pick a BETTER one to meet the needs.
      2014-09-16 09:09:29
  • Saw Minyau Germany How can be effect project whole system? Pros and Cons?
    2014-08-16 01:08:15

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan The system that was already developed and the new one that is being initiated.
      2014-08-25 16:08:26
  • Philip Pam Nigeria Is it possible that a perfect system can be created with high level minimal risk?
    2014-08-15 21:08:51

    • lyatuu oscar Tanzania Yes, it is.
      2014-09-16 08:09:42
    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes.
      2014-08-25 16:08:46
  • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana The feasibility study is a management-oriented activity. The objective of a feasibility study is to find out if an information system project can be done and to suggest possible alternative solutions. Projects are initiated for two broad reasons: 1. Problems that lend themselves to systems solutions 2. Opportunities for improving through: (a) upgrading systems (b) altering systems (c) installing new systems A feasibility study should provide management with enough information to decide: · Whether the project can be done · Whether the final product will benefit its intended users and organization · What are the alternatives among which a solution will be chosen · Is there a preferred alternative
    2014-08-14 23:08:35

    • lyatuu oscar Tanzania Remember Project is intended to solve problem. so, the solution that your going to use it is the system that will let you achieve the solution. Therefore, the preferred alternative are those feasibility you have take before starting a project.
      2014-09-16 08:09:55
    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes.
      2014-08-25 16:08:04
  • Adesanya Opeyemi Nigeria Then i can say Along time planing will lead to a short term execution with desirable results . but does it mean the full reason for adopting planning must be resolve {analogy , if the major reason for planning is to solve 20 problems which causes excessive loss and at the end my planning and feasibility study could solve 19 . does it mean i have not achieved my desired goal}
    2014-07-29 09:07:48

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes.
      2014-08-25 16:08:45
    • Nick Lukwiya Uganda if you managed to fix 19 out of 20, the plannimg and feasibility study was successful, in real life situation every successful company has unresolved challenges but efficiency must be far greater than deficiency. This is measured using Organisation Capacity Assessment Tool (OCAT).
      2014-08-13 12:08:35
  • Vikram Vasant Rotkar United Kingdom How the amount of money influence the outcome?
    2014-07-21 18:07:17

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Any outcome incured a loss in simple terms.
      2014-08-25 16:08:50
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 19:07:02

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Is this realistic?
      2014-08-25 16:08:24
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 19:07:58

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 19:07:30

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 19:07:17

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 19:07:06

  • Reza Abbasi Iran s it necessary to investigate better solutions?
    2014-06-22 15:06:28

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Why not to investigate the better solution?
      2014-08-25 16:08:33
    • Satu Korhonen Finland Yes, to ensure that the best solution to the problem gets chosen
      2014-06-25 15:06:24
  • Reza Abbasi Iran Is it necessary to investigate better solutions?
    2014-06-20 00:06:34

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan yes.
      2014-08-25 16:08:54
    • Glyn Chapman United Kingdom It is best to look at multiple options as this usually show what the best solution is for the amount of finance available.
      2014-07-21 20:07:27
  • Annette Weizbauer Germany Is there a better way of solving the problem?
    2014-06-15 14:06:29

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan Yes through case study.
      2014-08-25 16:08:27
    • Philip Pam Nigeria there is always a best way of solving a problem, solutions with less failure risk, minimal cost of establishment and best outcome should always be considered.
      2014-08-15 21:08:21
    • Reza Abbasi Iran Yes, the process can be achieved by identifying the best solutions
      2014-06-20 00:06:16
    • Parhalad Saini India It is identify by the company.
      2014-06-18 04:06:36
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