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ALISON: Diploma in Project Management


Comments about The planning phase - Feasibility study question 4

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- Module: The planning phase
- Topic: Feasibility study question 4

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  • Zinabie Tadesse Gebremedhin Ethiopia The establishment costs are one off costs and will not be repeated during the life of the system. Ongoing costs are the costs that will be faced each year in running the system. It includes the human resource costs, system consumables costs and the like. The ongoing costs must be low enough to justify the development of the system. That is, there is no point developing a new system to perform a job if the current system does it cheaper - unless there is some overwhelming need for change. The establishment costs will be incurred in the initial setting up of the system, however they will usually be viewed over the anticipated life of that system
    2014-11-25 11:11:29

  • Md Shohel Mahmud Bangladesh System and the cost will take clear position, and throughout the time it is important that they are gong side by side and harmonically.
    2014-11-16 09:11:07

  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya At this point in the feasibility study, the costs associated with the proposed system will be clearer. The costs will be divided into two categories - establishment costs and ongoing costs. Establishment costs are those associated with the actual creation of the system. This would include all development costs, hardware purchases and the like. The establishment costs are one off costs and will not be repeated during the life of the system. Ongoing costs are the costs that will be faced each year in running the system. It includes the human resource costs, system consumables costs and the like. The ongoing costs must be low enough to justify the development of the system. That is, there is no point developing a new system to perform a job if the current system does it cheaper - unless there is some overwhelming need for change. The establishment costs will be incurred in the initial setting up of the system, however they will usually be viewed over the anticipated life of that system
    2014-11-16 06:11:53

  • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya At this point in the feasibility study, the costs associated with the proposed system will be clearer. The costs will be divided into two categories - establishment costs and ongoing costs. Establishment costs are those associated with the actual creation of the system. This would include all development costs, hardware purchases and the like. The establishment costs are one off costs and will not be repeated during the life of the system. Ongoing costs are the costs that will be faced each year in running the system. It includes the human resource costs, system consumables costs and the like. The ongoing costs must be low enough to justify the development of the system. That is, there is no point developing a new system to perform a job if the current system does it cheaper - unless there is some overwhelming need for change. The establishment costs will be incurred in the initial setting up of the system, however they will usually be viewed over the anticipated life of that system
    2014-11-16 06:11:41

  • Caroline Omoro Kenya is it true to assume that in the long run, ongoing costs will be equal to or more than ongoing costs?suppose this is true ,then is it correct to state that the project is no longer viable?
    2014-11-11 12:11:49

    • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya At this point in the feasibility study, the costs associated with the proposed system will be clearer. The costs will be divided into two categories - establishment costs and ongoing costs. Establishment costs are those associated with the actual creation of the system. This would include all development costs, hardware purchases and the like. The establishment costs are one off costs and will not be repeated during the life of the system. Ongoing costs are the costs that will be faced each year in running the system. It includes the human resource costs, system consumables costs and the like. The ongoing costs must be low enough to justify the development of the system. That is, there is no point developing a new system to perform a job if the current system does it cheaper - unless there is some overwhelming need for change. The establishment costs will be incurred in the initial setting up of the system, however they will usually be viewed over the anticipated life of that system.
      2014-11-16 07:11:57
    • Cyrus Wanjohi Kenya Yah at this...if resource are not available you can declare the project is not viable.
      2014-11-16 06:11:55
  • Caroline Omoro Kenya establishment costs are one off payments done during the actual creation of the system.ongoing costs on the other hand are those that are incurred annually.if the current system cost does it cheaper than it will be futile to develop anew system to perform the desired task.
    2014-11-11 12:11:55

  • Janvier Nyandamu Rwanda what decision is taken if the establishment cost is higher so that even if the on-going is cheaper the system remains always expensive?
    2014-11-08 11:11:29

  • Nothando Gumpo United Kingdom At this point in the feasibility study, the costs associated with the proposed system will be clearer. The costs will be divided into two categories - establishment costs and ongoing costs. Establishment costs are those associated with the actual creation of the system. This would include all development costs, hardware purchases and the like. The establishment costs are one off costs and will not be repeated during the life of the system. Ongoing costs are the costs that will be faced each year in running the system. It includes the human resource costs, system consumables costs and the like. The ongoing costs must be low enough to justify the development of the system. That is, there is no point developing a new system to perform a job if the current system does it cheaper - unless there is some overwhelming need for change. The establishment costs will be incurred in the initial setting up of the system, however they will usually be viewed over the anticipated life of that system.
    2014-11-06 09:11:14

  • Assel Satpayeva Kazakhstan Simply call it as Project cost and Operational cost. 80% of the efforts at Project timeline and 20% of the efforts at Operational Timeline. More resources are required at Project stage.
    2014-10-29 03:10:57

  • Ralph Webster South Africa Can the system development costs and ongoing costs be justified on the improvements it will deliver? Usually they can through cost savings. At this point in the feasibility study, the costs associated with the proposed system will be clearer. The costs will be divided into two categories - establishment costs and ongoing costs. Establishment costs are those associated with the actual creation of the system. This would include all development costs, hardware purchases and the like. The establishment costs are one off costs and will not be repeated during the life of the system. Ongoing costs are the costs that will be faced each year in running the system. It includes the human resource costs, system consumables costs and the like. The ongoing costs must be low enough to justify the development of the system. That is, there is no point developing a new system to perform a job if the current system does it cheaper - unless there is some overwhelming need for change. The establishment costs will be incurred in the initial setting up of the system, however they will usually be viewed over the anticipated life of that system.??
    2014-10-19 07:10:00

  • Linda Manzano United States of America hummmm .... well when the project is done? the company must have the necessary skill to train personal in order to fix o modified any outcome with the project.
    2014-10-09 02:10:20

  • George Fragos Greece Which are the resources that would be need to look in order to run system on a smooth way??
    2014-09-29 09:09:44

  • ANNETTE ROBINSON United States of America Yes, you want to ensure the profits out weigh the costs in any business.
    2014-09-09 00:09:33

  • Philip Pam Nigeria Yes, i understand that if the cost of establishing the system equals or is more than the ongoing cost, it indicates a bad business. because obviously more will be needed in setting up the system than the running, but in a case were the are at a par, such a system should reconsidered.
    2014-08-15 20:08:05

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan that is true.
      2014-08-25 14:08:54
  • Adesanya Opeyemi Nigeria if the cost of the old method adopted and the new method cost balances each other but the new method is faster and efficient and procedural . does it mean its not feasible and can not be adopted .
    2014-07-29 08:07:11

    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan No it doesn't.
      2014-08-25 14:08:40
    • Willem Kruger South Africa If the input cost of the old and new system is balancing each other out then you will have to look at your output in this case you state that the new system is more effiecient ( faster), which lead to more output, what you will have to look into is supply and demand it doesnt help to produce stock/product wich you will not be able to sell, if there is a high demand for your product then only your new system will be feasable and you should adopt the new system
      2014-08-15 06:08:30
  • Vikram Vasant Rotkar United Kingdom How are the feasibility studies conducted?
    2014-07-21 17:07:20

    • Orin Phiri Zambia make a case study
      2014-10-02 09:10:24
    • Yai Deng Yai South Sudan By looking into various resources that would be need in order to run system smoothly.
      2014-08-25 15:08:36
    • Samuel Kofi Odoi Ghana by developing a case study files
      2014-08-14 22:08:32
    • Glyn Chapman United Kingdom I would suggest you read the sectors to do with this as the questions you are asking are all answered in the different sectors of the course as a whole. However to answer this question the simplest methods are through question and answers and research.
      2014-07-21 19:07:52
  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 18:07:57

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 18:07:36

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 18:07:06

  • Jones Hanungu Munang'andu Zambia Acquiring information systems Information systems are a major corporate asset, with respect both to the benefits they provide and to their costs. Therefore, organizations have to plan for the long term before acquiring and deploying information systems. On the basis of long-term corporate plans and the requirements of various individuals from data workers to top management, essential applications are identified and project priorities are set. For example, certain projects may have to be carried out immediately to satisfy a new government reporting regulation or to interact with a new customer's information system. Other projects may be given a higher priority owing to their strategic role or greater expected benefits. Once the need for a specific information system has been established, the system has to be acquired. The fundamental decision is: buy or make. Actually, this decision is not quite so simple. It is rarely possible to buy exactly the right information system. Although the hardware, telecommunications, and system software may be purchased or leased from vendors, information systems generally require a customized approach. An information system must model the specific, and possibly unique, way that a particular organization operates. Acquisition from external sources There are three principal ways to acquire an information system from outside the organization. The most common method is to purchase or lease a software package that is usually customized internally or by an outside contractor. Instead of an expensive purchase or rental, an organization may decide to use the services of an application service provider (ASP), a firm that makes applications available over the Web. This practice is particularly popular with very expensive packages, such as those for enterprise resource planning, in which customers pay for the use of only the software modules that they actually need. Finally, a number of firms outsource day-to-day running and development of their information systems to a specialized vendor.
    2014-07-20 18:07:57

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